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Immunity from seizure

Cultural objects intended to form part of a forthcoming exhibition at the British Library that may be covered by immunity from seizure are listed below.

Part 6 of the Tribunals, Courts and Enforcement Act 2007 provides immunity from seizure for cultural objects which are loaned from overseas to temporary public exhibitions in approved museums or galleries in the UK where conditions are met when the object enters the UK.

The conditions are:

  • The object is usually kept outside the UK
  • The object is not owned by a person who is resident in UK
  • Importing the object does not contravene any law
  • The object is brought into UK for the purpose of a temporary public exhibition at an approved museum or gallery
  • The museum or gallery has published information about the object.

 

The following manuscripts will be on display in the exhibition Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War from 19 October 2018 to 19 February 2019

Stockholm Codex Aureus (Stockholm, Kungliga biblioteket, MS A 135, ff. 10-11, 144-145)

Kungliga Biblioteket ,  Box 5039, S-102 41 Stockholm, Sweden

The Codex Aureus is a highly illuminated 8th-century Gospel-book, written on alternating purple-stained pages and uncoloured parchment. It is also known for a 9th-century marginal inscription on f. 11r that records how it was ransomed from a war band by a nobleman called Alfred and his family. It has 191 leaves and is currently disbound.

i. type of object: manuscript
ii. description of the material: parchment, ink, pigments and gold
iii. identity and nationality of creators: unknown; probably made in Kent
iv. the title: known as The Stockholm Codex Aureus (contains the four Gospels)
v. page dimensions: 395 × 314 mm
vi. date: mid-8th century

 

 
   

Pages from the Stockholm Codex Aureus (Stockholm, Kungliga biblioteket, MS A 135, ff. 10v-11r and ff. 144v-145r

This manuscript was presented to the Royal Book Collections and Library in Stockholm by Johan Gabriel Sparwenfeldt (b. 1655, d. 1727), who was an ambassador, linguist and bibliophile. He had acquired the manuscript from the Spanish noblewoman Catalina de Haro (b. 1672, d. 1733).

References

N. R. Ker, Catalogue of Manuscripts Containing Anglo-Saxon (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1957), 456.

Andrew Breeze, "The Stockholm 'Golden Gospels' in seventeenth-century Spain." Notes and Queries, 43 (1996), 395-97.

Richard Gameson (ed.). 2001–02. The Codex Aureus. An Eighth-Century Gospel Book. Stockholm, Kungliga Bibliotek, A. 135, Early English Manuscripts in Facsimile, 28–29 (Copenhagen: Rosenkilde and Bagger).

 

The Vercelli Book (Vercelli, Biblioteca Capitolare CXVII)

Fondazione Museo del Tesoro del Duomo e Archivio Capitolare, Piazza Alessandro D’Angennes, 51- 13100 Vercelli Italy

This manuscript contains a collection of Old English literature. It is one of the ‘four poetic codices’ that contain the majority of Old English verse that survives to this day. 

i. type of object: manuscript
ii. description of the material: parchment and ink
iii. identity and nationality of creators: unknown; made in south-east England
iv. the title: The Vercelli Book (contains the poems The Dream of the Rood, Elene, Andreas, The Fates of the Apostles, Soul and Body, as well as prose homilies and prose vita of St Guthlac)
v. page dimensions: 310 x 202 mm
vi. date: second half of the 10th century

 

  

Opening of the poem ‘The Dream of the Rood’ in Vercelli, Biblioteca Capitolare CXVII, ff. 104v-105r

The manuscript has been in Italy since the late 11th or early 12th century, as can be seen from the addition of Psalms 26.9 on f. 24v. The scribe omitted neque despicias me before deus, in a style associated with the northern Italian peninsula (see The Vercelli Book, ed. by Sisam (1976), p. 44.) It was held by Vercelli Cathedral at the latest by 1602, when it was listed in a catalogue by Canon Giovanni Francesco Leone as ‘Liber Gothicus, sive Longobardus, (eum legere no valeo).’  This catalogue was printed in G. De-Gregory, Istoria della Vercellese Letteratura ed Arti iv (Turin, 1824), 568. The manuscript may also have been that referenced in the 1426 inventory of Vercelli Cathedral’s documents on f. 154r.

References

The Vercelli Book: A Late Tenth-Century Manuscript Containing Prose and Verse, Vercelli Biblioteca Capitolare CXVII, ed. by Celia Sisam, Early English Manuscripts in Facsimile, 19 (Copenhagen: Rosenkilde and Bagger, 1976).

 

Codex Amiatinus (Florence, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana, MS Amiatino 1)

Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana, Piazza San Lorenzo 9, 50123 Florence

Codex Amiatinus is the oldest surviving, mostly complete copy of the Vulgate translation of the Bible into Latin. It was made at the monastery of Wearmouth-Jarrow and taken as a gift for the pope by Abbot Ceolfrith in 716. It consists of around 1030 parchment leaves. It includes several diagrams and illuminations, in addition to the text.  

i. type of object: manuscript
ii. description of the material: parchment, ink and pigments
iii. identity and nationality of creators: monks of Wearmouth-Jarrow; Northumbrian
iv. the title: Codex Amiatinus (containing Jerome’s Vulgate translation of the Bible)
v. page dimensions: c. 505 × 340 mm
vi. date: before June 716

 

  

Dedication page and portrait of Ezra, Florence, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana, MS Amiatino 1, f. Iv, Vr

Peter Leopold (d. 1792), Grand Duke of Tuscany and Holy Roman Emperor, ordered that this manuscript be moved to Florence after the suppression of the monastery of San Salvatore, Amiata in 1782. The manuscript was housed in Castello Nuovo, Florence before being moved to the Laurenziana Library. The manuscript had been in San Salvatore since the late 9th century, when Peter the Lombard altered its dedicatory inscription to refer to himself and San Salvatore, where previously the inscription had recorded that the manuscript was being given from Ceolfrith to St Peter’s, Rome.

References

A. Bandini, Bibliotheca Leopoldina Laurentiana, 3 vols (Florence, 1791-1793) I, 701-03 and 708-11.

The Life of Ceolfrith, in Abbots of Wearmouth and Jarrow, ed. and trans. by Christopher Grocock and I.N. Wood (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2013).

C. de Hamel, Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts (London: Penguin, 2016).

R. Marsden, The Text of the Old Testament in Anglo-Saxon England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995).

W. Schipper, ‘Style and Layout of Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts’, in Anglo-Saxon Styles, ed. C. Karkov and G. Brown (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2003), p. 153.


Calendar of Willibrord (Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, lat  10837)

Bibliothèque nationale de France, Quai François-Mauriac, 75706 Paris, France

This manuscript includes a calendar which was owned (and annotated) by St Willibrord, founder of Echternach Abbey. It also includes a martyrology, horologium, prayers, Easter tables and other related materials. Scholars have debated whether this manuscript originated in Ireland, Northumbria or Echternach. It has 45 folios.

i. type of object: manuscript
ii. description of the material: Parchment and ink
iii. identity and nationality of creators: unknown
iv. the title: Calendar of Willibrord
v. page dimensions: 220 x 170 mm
vi. date: late 7th and early 8th century

 

 

Page from a calendar with an annotation possibly composed by St Willibrord, BnF lat 10837, f. 39v

The national library of France acquired this manuscript when the official, Jean-Baptiste Maugérard, sent it and several other manuscripts from Echternach to Paris in October 1802 (as recorded in BnF, Département des Manuscrits, Archives Modernes, 497). It was previously owned by the Abbey of Echternach until the law of 1 September 1796 on the nationalisation of church property.

References

William O’Sullivan, ‘Manuscripts and Palaeography’, in A New History of Ireland: Prehistoric and Early Ireland, ed. by D. Ó Cróinín (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005), pp. 511-48 (513, 522-25)

 

Echternach Gospels (Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, lat  9389)

Description (including number of pages?)

i. type of object: manuscript
ii. description of the material: parchment, ink, pigments
iii. identity and nationality of creators: unknown
iv. the title: The Echternach Gospels
v. page dimensions: 335 x 255 mm
vi. date: c. 700

 

  

St Mark’s evangelist symbol and the opening page of his gospel, BnF, lat 9389, ff. 75v-76r

 

The national library of France acquired this manuscript when the official Jean-Baptiste Maugérard sent it and several other manuscripts from Echternach to Paris in October 1802 (as recorded in BnF, Département des Manuscrits, Archives Modernes, 497). It was previously owned by the Abbey of Echternach until the law of 1 September 1796 on the nationalisation of church property.

References

Biblical Commentaries from the Canterbury School of Theodore and Hadrian, ed. by B. Bischoff and M. Lapidge (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994).

U. Durand and E. Martène, Voyage littéraire de deux religieux Benedictins de la Congregation de Saint Maur (Paris, 1717-24), p. 297-298.

B. Ebersperger, Die angelsachsischen Handschriften in den Pariser Bibliotheken (Heidelberg: C. Winter, 1999).

E.A. Lowe, Codices Latini Antiquiores, 11 volumes (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1934-66), V, 578.

D. Ó Cróinín, ‘Rath Melsigi, Willibrord and the Earliest Echternach Manuscripts’, Peritia 3 (1984), 17-49. 

 

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, lat 6401

This manuscript contains an illuminated copy of Boethius’s Consolation of Philosophy and De institutione arithmetica, made in the late 10th century. Some further texts (Epitaphium Gauzlini and Radulf of Liège and Ragimbold of Cologne, Letters on geometry) were added in the 11th century.

i. type of object: manuscript
ii. description of the material: parchment and ink
iii. identity and nationality of creators: unknown; based in England and the Abbey of St Benoît-sur-Loire, Fleury
iv. the title: Boethius’s Consolation of Philosophy and De institutione arithmetica, Radulf of Liège and Ragimbold of Cologne, Letters on geometry and Epitaphium Gauzlini
v. dimensions: 275 x 195 mm
vi. date: late 10th-century, with 11th-century additions

 

  

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, lat 6401, ff. 13v, 15r

The Bibliothèque royale de France bought this manuscript in 1732 from Charles-Eléonor Colbert (d. 1740), Comte de Seignelay, along with the rest of his manuscripts. He had inherited the collection of Jean-Baptiste Colbert (b. 1619, d. 1683). The Bibliothèque royale de France later formed the basis for the Bibliothèque nationale following the French Revolution.

Previously, the manuscript had belonged to the Benedictine Abbey of St Benoît-sur-Loire, Fleury, P. Daniel and Chandelier, avocat au Parlement and collector, from whom Colbert bought the manuscript in 1674.

References

Les manuscrits de Chrétien de Troyes, ed. by Keith Busby, 2 vols (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1993).

 

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, lat 10861

This early 9th-century manuscript contains a collection of saints’ lives and passions. It has 123 folios and some decorated and coloured initials.  

i. type of object: manuscript
ii. description of the material: parchment, ink and pigments
iii. identity and nationality of creators: Unknown; probably Kent (Canterbury) or Francia
iv. the title: Various hagiographies
v. page dimensions: 255 x 185 mm
vi. date: 9th century

 

 

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France lat 10861, f. 2r

The Bibliothèque nationale bought this manuscript from Joseph Janon (d. 1837) after the sale of Joseph-Jean-Pascal Gay (d. 1832), architect from Lyon. It was previously owned by the Cathédrale Saint-Pierre de Beauvais: ex libris ‘sancti petri beluacensis’ added in a late 12th- or 13th-century hand (1r).

References

M. Brown, ‘Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale, lat. 10861 and the scriptorium of Christ Church, Canterbury’, Anglo-Saxon England, 15 (1986), 119-37 (p. 121).

G. Bruyere,‘Contribution à l’étude de la bibliothèque de l’architecte Joseph-Jean-Pascal Gay’, Histoire lyonnaises [https://lyonnais.hypotheses.org/150 accessed 7 April 2017].

L. Delisle, Le Cabinet des Manuscrits de la Bibliothèque Nationale (Paris, 1874), II, 293, 339.

 

Paris Psalter (Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, lat 8824)

The Paris Psalter is a mid-11th-century copy of the Book of Psalms that contains parallel versions in Latin and Old English, with line drawings interspersed throughout the text. It has 187 folios.   

i. type of object: manuscript
ii. description of the material: parchment and ink, gold, pigments
iii. identity and nationality of creators: unknown; southern England
iv. the title: the Psalms in Latin and Old English  
v. page dimensions: 530 x 190
vi. date: mid-11th century

 

  

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, lat 8824, ff. 3v-4r

This manuscript formed part of the Bibliothèque royale, which in turn became the basis for the Bibliothèque nationale de France. It was given to the Bibliothèque royale in 1752 by the canons of the Sainte-Chapelle de Bourges. It had been donated to them by Jean (b. 1340, d. 1416) duc de Berry by letters patent in 1404.

References

For more information, please see the BnF’s online catalogue (http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b530193948)

 

The Sherborne Pontifical (Bibliothèque nationale de France, lat 943)

The Sherborne Pontifical is a late 10th-century pontifical that has been associated with St Dunstan. It includes fine drawings and later 11th-century additions.

i. type of object: manuscript
ii. description of the material: parchment and ink, pigments
iii. identity and nationality of creators: southern England
iv. the title: the Sherborne Pontifical
v. dimensions: 315 x 205 mm
vi. date: late 10th century, with early 11th century additions

 

  

Bibliothèque nationale de France, lat 943, ff. 9v-10r

The Bibliothèque royale bought this manuscript from Léonard de Jayac of Reims in 1701. The Bibliothèque royale formed the basis of the current Bibliothèque nationale’s collections. Jayac inherited the manuscript from Antoine Faure (d. 1689). It may previously have been owned by the Cathedral of St Mary, Sherborne in the early 11th century, when a list of bishops of Sherborne and some letters pertaining to bishops of Sherborne were added. It may have moved to the continent as early as the late 11th century, when a note on the library of Notre-Dame de Paris was added (f. 154v).

References

Brigit Ebersperger, Die angelsächsischen Handschriften in den Pariser Bibliotheken: mit einer edition von Aelfrics Kirchweihhomilie aus der Handschrift Paris, BN, lat. 943 (Heidelberg: C. Winter, 1999).

Melanie Holcomb, Pen and Parchment: Drawing in the Middle Ages (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2009), no. 8 (p. 52).

 

Book of Durrow (Dublin, Trinity College, MS 57)

Trinity College, College Green, Dublin 2.  Ireland

This manuscript is an early Insular Gospel-books with carpet pages, evangelist portraits and other illumination. It is believed to be the earliest surviving fully decorated Insular Gospel-book. It was probably made in Durrow, Co. Offaly or Iona c. 700. It contains 248 folios.  

i. type of object: manuscript
ii. description of the material: parchment, ink and pigments
iii. identity and nationality of creators: unknown; Probably Ireland, or Iona
iv. the title: The Book of Durrow (contains the Four Gospels)
v. page dimensions: 245 x 145 mm
vi. date: c. 700

 

 

Carpet page and beginning of St Mark’s Gospel, Dublin, Trinity College, MS 57, ff. 85v-86r

Trinity College, Dublin acquired this manuscript when it was donated by Henry Jones (b. 1605, d. 1682), Church of Ireland bishop of Meath. It was previously owned by Durrow Abbey in County Offaly.

References

Marvin L. Colker, Trinity College Library Dublin: Descriptive Catalogue of the Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts (Aldershot: Scolar Press, 1991), pp. 104-06.

The Whole Works of the Most Rev James Ussher, DD, ed. C. R. Elrington, 17 vols (Dublin: Hodges and Smith, 1847-64), vol. 6.

Lloyd Laing, ‘The Provenance of the Book of Durrow’, Scottish Archaeological Review, 9/10 (1995), 115-24.

Bernard Meehan, The Book of Durrow (Dublin: Town House, 1996).

William O’Sullivan, ‘Correspondence of David Rothe and James Ussher, 1619-23’, Collectanea Hibernica, 36/37 (1994-95), 7-49.

The Annals of Tigernach, ed. and trans. by Whitley Stokes, 2 vols (Lampeter: Llanerch, 1993), ii, p. 316.

 
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