A 19th century verse on 'Woman's Rights'

Ephemera

Description

English

Traditional Victorian gender roles upheld that women's rightful place was within the home - the private, or domestic, sphere - where they were subordinate to men as daughter, wife and mother. Essentially, women were viewed as man's helpmate. Society was constructed in such a way - legally, politically and economically - as to enforce their dependence on men.

This set of verses, printed on a small piece of blue card, promotes this concept of woman. Her identity is defined in relation to man as his 'comforter'. The ironic title, 'Woman's Rights', indicates that it was written in response to the growing women's rights movement of the latter half of the 19th century. In the last stanza the anonymous author alludes to a Christian God to bolster their argument that gender roles are set in stone, a manifestation of God's natural order on earth.

Full title
Woman's Rights
Published
n.d.
Format
Ephemera
Creator
M C M R
Held by
British Library
Usage Terms
Free from known copyright restrictions
Shelfmark
11621.h.1.(141.)

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