Italians! The horrors of Belgium and France are repeated in the invaded Veneto!

Description

This poster shows the unwavering propaganda message that Germans were barbaric killers. It aims to uphold the morale of the Italian civilian population when they were threatened by the invading enemy. It was created by ‘corporal of daring’ Renato Arlotti and Adele Zandrino, a well known painter during the conflict. Zandrino produced patriotic postcards and posters, as well as adverts for the Pirelli Factory, famous for manufacturing car tyres. There are several cases in which the themes of war were exploited for advertising purposes.

Transcript

Italians!
The horrors of Belgium and France are repeated in the invaded Veneto! Austria and Germany joint in evil, perfect their ferocity.

There is a need to crush the vipers! There is a need to liberate the living and the dead! We support our soldiers, who with their heroism and values resist the mighty enemy blows, with calm and faith.
The final victory is ours, absolutely, mathematically.
The Germans will not win! Civility and humanity cannot recoil!

On the threshold of the house there is a child still, stupefied, shaken. His face resisting a smile and already carrying a trace of pain. In the field a peasant.

decrepit through age, in the sky the arms are raised praying, while close to him there is an old woman rocking her grandchild murmuring a prayer and a threat.

Without bells the bell tower arises, mute; it no longer sounds Ave Maria! Only the cry of the enemy.

Wicked drunk of crimes, life is full. Sings softly a gentle voice: “Oh Monte Grappa you are my country!”

Arlotti Renato
Corporal of the daring
Full title:
Italians! The horrors of Belgium and France are repeated in the invaded Veneto! Austria and Germany, united in the bad, improve their ferocity
Published:
1918
Format:
Poster / Drawing
Creator:
Adele Zandrino , Renato Arlotti
Held by:
Istituto Centrale per il Catalogo Unico
Usage terms:
Public Domain

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