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Description

Work towards the war effort wasn’t only at the front line. Women at home knitted clothes to protect soldiers against icy winters, which in some cases caused more deaths than the hostilities. Huge numbers of knitted goods were sent to the Front together with gift parcels. These went to husbands, fathers and brothers in the trenches to support them from home.

The Little Knitting Book, released by the Patriotic Women’s Club, explains in words and pictures how to produce woollen hats, socks, chest or knee warmers, gloves, ear and wrist muffs. The fact these instructions were deemed worth printing in a stand-alone publication demonstrates the importance of the work. During the war knitting became a patriotic mission.

Transcript

[partial transcription]

Knitting book

Published by
National women’s association, Königsberg, Nm.

Printed and commissioned by Gustav Reischel printing house, Königsberg, Nm.

  1. [partial transcription]

    Knitting book

    Published by
    National women’s association, Königsberg, Nm.

    Printed and commissioned by Gustav Reischel printing house, Königsberg, Nm.

  2. [partial transcription]

    Field cap 1a.

    Materials:
    Field-grey or other grey soft wool,
    lighter shade, corresponding to Schmidtchen wool
    strength No. 16, 100-110 grams,
    5 knitting needles 10/0 or horn needles of
    the same size.

    1. Neck border, 8 ½ cm in height.
    On 4 needles loosely cast 132 stitches
    (33 on each needle) and knit 38 rounds k2, p2.
    Now drop 12 stitches in a round as follows:

    K1. Cast off 2 stitches, knit 2 together, cast off 2, knit 2 together
    Cast off 2 stitches, knit 2 together.

    Do the same on the second needle. On needles 3 and 4,
    drop the same number of stitches in the same way, but
    at the end of the needle.

    2. Middle section knit plain, 7cm
    Knit 34 rounds with garter stitch. Pick up 12 stitches
    for the last round, in the same places as
    previously when dropping the 12th stitch.

    ***

    Large heel, without cap, 16cm in height.
    Now knit a large heel with needles 2 and 3. Pick up
    6 stitches each from needles 1 and 4, so 63
    rows k1, p1. However, the end stitches must be
    slipped as when knitting the heel of a stocking.

    4. Small heel
    Now separate the middle 26 stitches
    (1/3 of the width) and knit 50
    rows k1, p1, thus gaining the border stitches
    of the large heel, exactly as when
    tapering the stocking heel.

    After the cap is finished, gain
    34 chain stitches on each side,
    again as with the heel of a stocking. Now
    you have 5 needles with 148 stitches.
    Then from needle 1 (cap), drop 4 stitches,
    so that only 22 stitches still remain.
    Drop 2 stitches from the end of needle 2
    and 2 stitches from the front of needle 3.
    Likewise, drop 2 stitches from the end
    of both needles 3 and 4, thus keeping
    136 stitches in the whole round.

  3. [partial transcription]

    Panel 1a Panel 1b

  4. [partial transcription]

    5. The round k2, p2, framing the face, 10cm in width
    Now knit 34 rounds k2, p2
    and then bind off the stitches.
    Total length of cap 34 cm.

    Note 1: To those who have the material at their disposal,
    Ms Christine Duchrow, Berlin-Tempelhof, Theodorstr. 5
    recommends Hansa silk for military caps.
    100-110 grams on average would be sufficient
    for 1 cap.

    Note 2: For the sake of simplicity, the materials
    for the field caps are only mentioned
    if they differ from the first pattern.


    ***

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