Letter from President of the Board of Trade Walter Runciman to the Cabinet relating to shipping losses

Letter

Description

English

This letter from President of the Board of Trade Walter Runciman to the Cabinet predates the German campaign of unrestricted submarine warfare by almost a year and yet the threat posed to shipping in April 1916 is still grave enough to be described in bold and urgent language. The letter reports that more ships are being lost than can be replaced through shipbuilding and Runciman suggests that a shortage of labour is partly to blame. Many skilled labourers went to fight, reducing the productivity of the industries they left behind. Runciman warns the government that the inability to build replacement ships could result in an inability to supply Britain with the food it needs to survive: ‘unless the activities of our shipyards are restored, we may find ourselves unable to victual this country’. The letter’s predictions proved accurate when U-boat attacks on merchant vessels nearly crippled Britain in 1917, before the last-minute introduction of a convoy system made seafaring far less treacherous.

Jellicoe Papers

John Rushworth Jellicoe was a navy officer who commanded The Grand Fleet during World War One. He led Allied warships against the German High Seas Fleet and was involved in high-level decision-making about naval operations. The Jellicoe Papers comprise correspondence, memoranda, reports, charts and other documents either created or used by Jellicoe during his service in the Royal Navy.

Full title
JELLICOE PAPERS. Vol. XLVII. Personal and official letters received by Jellicoe before and during the First World War; 1900-1916. Letter from President of the Board of Trade Walter Runciman to the Cabinet relating to shipping losses, 12 April 1916.
Created
12 April, 1916
Format
Letter
Creator
Walter Runciman
Held by
British Library
Copyright: © 
Crown Copyright and provided under an Open Government Licence.
Usage Terms
Open Government Licence
Shelfmark
Add MS 49035

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