Ligue Souvenez-vous

Postcard/Booklet

Description

English

This ensemble, which includes a booklet, a postcard and a collection of stamps, was created during the First World War by the league Souvenez-vous (French for ‘remember’) based in Paris. The postcard and the stamps show a German soldier holding a bloody knife and a torch with the cathedral of Reims burning in the background. On the right, the same man is represented as a respectable seller. The booklet explains the goals of the league, perpetuates the memory of German crimes after the war, and lists the league’s more prominent members.

This group of documents reflects the complex cultural climate of the Home Front during the First World War. Atrocity propaganda served the mobilisation process of the civilian society, without which the war effort would have been threatened. All symbols used in these documents, including the burning of the cathedral of Reims, were ways to demonstrate that the conflict was a struggle without ambivalence between good and evil.

Full title
Ligue Souvenez-vous
Format
Postcard / Booklet
Held by
British Library
Copyright: © 
Ligue Souvenez-vous

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