Outline of the New Poor Law Amendment Act

Book

Description

English

The Poor Laws of 1834 centralised the existing workhouse system to cut the costs of poor relief and discourage perceived laziness. They resulted in the infamous workhouses of the early Victorian period: bleak places of forced labour and starvation rations. The misery caused by the Poor Laws was a topic frequently addressed by mid-century novelists, writers and campaigners such as Charles Dickens (1812–1870). 

One of the most enduring writers on the Poor Laws was the prolific legal author John Frederick Archbold (1785–1870). His treatises on parish law were important, practical legal reference works. The sections involving the Poor Laws and their amendments came out in stand-alone editions, such as this one from 1842, The New Poor Law Amendment Act, and the recent rules and orders of the Poor Law Commissioners. With a practical introduction, notes and forms. His Poor Law books were in particular demand, and still regarded as authoritative up to thirty years after his death.

Full title
The New Poor Law Amendment Act, and the recent rules and orders of the Poor Law Commissioners. With a practical introduction, notes and forms.
Published
1842 , London
Format
Book
Creator
John Frederick Archbold
Held by
British Library
Usage Terms
Free from known copyright restrictions
Shelfmark
1381.f.7.

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