Playbill for the New Strand Theatre advertising Charles Webb's adaptation of A Christmas Carol

Advertisement/Ephemera/Playbill/Illustration/Image

Description

English

Charles Webb’s play version of A Christmas Carol was an unofficial, pirated adaptation of Charles Dickens’s novel. This playbill, printed in blue ink, advertises its run at the New Strand Theatre in London, from 26-28 December 1844, a year after the novel’s publication. The bill’s introduction and synopsis of the play is written in dramatic and sensational language, the effect heightened by its choice of different fonts, punctuation and vocabulary. The playbill reveals that Webb’s version promised ‘superb and peculiar Mechanical Effects (never before achieved)’, ‘a moving diorama’ and music. 

Webb’s version was popular, in large part due to the great success of the novel: whether an official or pirated adaptation, it seems the public simply couldn’t get enough of A Christmas Carol. As implied in the text of the playbill, most of the audience would already have read the novel, or at least been familiar with its scenes and characters.

Full title
Original playbill in blue ink for the New Strand Theatre. Advertising [Charles Webb's adaptation] of A Christmas Carol. Dated December 26th-28th, 1844. [from the author's presentation copy of The Life of Dickens, 1872-74]
Published
26-28 December 1844 , London
Format
Advertisement / Ephemera / Playbill / Illustration / Image
Creator
The New Strand Theatre , John Forster [compiler]
Held by
British Library
Usage Terms
Free from known copyright restrictions
Shelfmark
Dex 316 - Vol II, part I

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