Soldiers from the reserve, called up for duty at the outbreak of the war

Photograph

Description

English

This picture features new Danish defence force recruits donning their marching equipment and rifles. The soldiers are surrounded by children taking a great interest in the preparations.

Although Denmark remained neutral throughout World War One, a major defence force of 50,000 men was gathered to defend this neutrality. Most of this force was used to protect Copenhagen. As early as 1915 and during the following years the force was gradually reduced, until its end in 1919. At its peak there were more than 60,000 men in arms in Denmark, the country’s highest ever number.

Danish

Det lykkedes Danmark at opretholde sin neutralitet under hele Første Verdenskrig. Som et led i forberedelserne for at kunne hævde sin neutralitet over for de krigsførende lande blev en større sikringsstyrke på 50.000 mand indkaldt. Heraf afsattes størstedelen til forsvaret af København.
På billedet ses nyligt indkaldte sikringsstyrker med oppakning og udleverede geværer. Soldaterne er omringede af børn, der nysgerrigt følger med i krigsforberedelserne.
Allerede fra 1915 og frem begyndte man dog at nedbringe antallet af indkaldte, og i 1919 blev styrken nedlagt. Med indkaldelsen af Sikringsstyrken nåede antallet af mænd under våben i starten af krigen op på over 60.000, hvilket er det højeste antal nogensinde i Danmark.

Full title
Soldiers from the reserve, who had been called up for duty at the outbreak of the war
Created
1914
Format
Photograph
Held by
Det Konglige Bibliotek
Usage Terms
Some rights reserved

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