Varney, an early vampire story

Description

English

This famous penny blood, Varney the Vampyre, is comparatively well written, with an original plot. The first edition of 1845-46 ran to 868 pages; in this version of the early 1850s the text is shortened to 470 pages, but some of the most powerful original illustrations have been re-used. During the peak period of penny blood publishing in the 1840s Edward Lloyd's artists experimented with the layout of their front pages, using irregular shaped blocks to create a more sophisticated design.

Predating Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897) by nearly half a decade, Varney is one of the earlier examples of the vampire in literature.

Full title
Varney the Vampyre; or, the Feast of blood. A romance
Published
estimated 1854 , London
Format
Book / Illustration / Image
Creator
James Malcolm Rymer
Held by
British Library
Usage terms
Public Domain
Shelfmark
12624.e.6.

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