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Forthcoming events and conferences

The Eccles Centre for American Studies regularly organises and supports conferences, seminars, lectures and other events on North American and transatlantic themes, often in partnership with other institutions and organisations.

 


Summer Scholars

When Mondays and Fridays from 4 July - 26 August, 12.30-14.00
Where Check individual listing for room location
Price Free, no booking required

The Eccles Centre sponsors numerous Visiting Fellowships and Postgraduate Research Awards each year. The Summer Scholars programme highlights the work that they have done during their residency in the British Library, bringing the latest research related to the North Americas collections to a public audience.

 

MONDAY 1 AUGUST The Centre for Conservation Foyle Room
The Poetics of Reticence: Emily Dickinson and Her Contemporaries
Eve Grubin discusses Emily Dickinson’s poems and their characteristic style against the backdrop of poetry written by other American women during Dickinson’s time.

The Modern Consuming Housewife
From feminine vice to essential feminine interest, Rachael Alexander explores changing attitudes to makeup and fashion as seen in, and encouraged by, the Ladies' Home Journal and Canadian Home Journal of the 1920s.

 

FRIDAY 5 AUGUST The Centre for Conservation Foyle Room
America, Britain, and the 'Islamic Bomb'
Malcolm Craig explores the intersections between America, Britain, Pakistan's nuclear programme, and political Islam's rise in the 1970s. Was Pakistan building an 'Islamic bomb' or was it all just a media scare?

 

MONDAY 8 AUGUST The Centre for Conservation Foyle Room
‘What Irish Boys Can Do’
Catherine Bateson analyses more than two-dozen American Civil War songs held in the British Library’s U.S. archives, and explores how ballads sung the story of Irish involvement in the conflict.

Dreaming of the Orient during the War on Germs
Bianca Scoti discusses oriental rugs in middle class homes and discourses on domestic hygiene in American magazines and periodicals at the turn of the twentieth century.

 

FRIDAY 12 AUGUST The Centre for Conservation Foyle Room
Selling Black History: from Margins to Mainstream
James West examines the content of EBONY magazine as a case study into the production, dissemination and marketisation of popular black history during the second half of the twentieth century.

About Trauma - Constructing Medical Narratives of the Vietnam War
Nicole Cassie examines how medical Vietnam veterans have engaged with the evolving psychological and social understanding of post-war trauma. It also explores why they often identify as 'resilient' as opposed to 'traumatised,' despite having experienced some of the worst of the war.

 

MONDAY 15 AUGUST The Centre for Conservation Foyle Room
American Genre Painting and Magazine Illustration, John Fagg
PLEASE NOTE THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED.

 

FRIDAY 19 AUGUST The Centre for Conservation Foyle Room
How to Blow Up an Oil Rig...
Harry Whitehead’s third novel concerns the oil business. Big subject, overwhelming research. So when to go ‘shallow’, when ‘deep’? And just how do you blow…?

Reading Don DeLillo in the Archives
Rebecca Harding shares how the materials in the British Library’s collections have helped her to see beyond common critical frameworks in her research, a study of the role of the body in the fiction of Don DeLillo.


MONDAY 22 AUGUST The Centre for Conservation Foyle Room
'Put all to fire and sword'
Nicola Martin compares and contrasts the experiences and encounters of various groups of ‘others’, and considers pacification in the eighteenth-century British Empire from Culloden to Quebec.

Britain and the Anglo-American War of 1812
The 1812 Anglo-American War may be the most overlooked conflict in British history. Peter O’Connor explores the domestic impact of the war with a particular focus on the response of radical democrats within Britain who had held up the USA as a model political system since the Revolution.


FRIDAY 26 AUGUST The Centre for Conservation Foyle Room
The Great American Desert
Eccles Centre Writer in Residence William Atkins is working on a cultural history and travel book about the world’s deserts, with a particular focus on the US southwest. He discusses his use of the America’s collections in researching the evolution of the US’s perception of its desert regions, from John C. Frémont’s account of his exploration of the Great Basin in 1843, to the development of an American ‘desert aesthetic’ in the seminal writings of John C. Van Dyke, Mary Austin and Edward Abbey in the twentieth century.

 


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