Labyrinth

The seven coil labyrinth is an ancient form of maze. The walker follows the path of the seven known heavenly bodies - Sun, Moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Saturn and Jupiter with the Earth at the center of the Universe. The maze was walked as a ritual journey.

  • Use a pair of compasses to draw seven concentric circles
  • Use a ruler to draw a number of paths leading from the outer ring to the centre
  • Using this construction as a guide, draw a route starting at the outer entrance of one of the paths heading for the centre
  • Rules: you may follow a curved path around a ring for as far as you wish but when you make a turn inwards or outwards onto another ring you must always make a second, immediate turn in the same direction. For instance, a turn to the left must always be followed by another immediate turn to the left
  • Draw a 'hedge' between the pathway you have worked out. (see Drawing Mazes image).
  • Draw and paint a 3D version of your labyrinth
  • Scan and repeat it to form a never ending maze (see 3D Labyrinth image)
  • Build your maze from pebbles on a beach or sticks in a garden. Make a herb garden, paint on the school playground. Take photographs for your Research Book

Drawings of mazes
Drawing Mazes

Drawing Mazes

 

Maze patterns on stained paper
3D Labyrinth

3D Labyrinth

Carpet Bugs

The Carpet Pages are a major feature of the Lindisfarne Gospels. They introduce the beginning of the book and the start of each of the four Gospels. Each is a variation on the cross form. Each of different geometry and character, each featuring a complex knot of birds and creatures. Design and paint your own carpet designs using insect forms.

  • Sketch insects - beetles, bugs, spiders, moths, butterflies, dragon flies, grasshoppers, bees, ants, wasps, flies (see Drawing Moths and Bugs image) Visit the websites at the bottom of this page for ideas
  • Simplify their forms and markings and come up with designs that fit snugly into triangular, square, rectangular or hexagonal shapes
  • Draw one of your designs onto thin card and cut out to use as a template (legs can be a problem - either make them fat or leave them off and draw them in later).
  • Draw a grid on a page in your Research Book. The shapes making up the grid will need to be the same shape and size as your bug design (triangles, squares, rectangles or hexagons)
  • Draw a bug into each shape in the grid using the template to draw around. Think about the direction in which your army of bugs is marching or flying (bees do the waggle dance) (see Carpet Bugs Template, Carpet Moths 1 and 2 images)
  • Draw in the markings of each insect (they don't all have to be the same)
  • Paint (collage shiny sweet wrappers if you wish - excellent for beetles)
  • Scan one of your drawings and repeat using image manipulating software. Print out the images for your Research Book (see Bees and Hopper Carpet images)
  • Try a similar idea by drawing your design onto an eraser. Make a rubber stamp printing block by carefully cutting away the background with a craft knife. Keep the design very simple - it can be tricky cutting out small shapes (see Bug Stamp image)
  • Use a brush to apply a thin layer of paint to the stamp (not too much as it will ooze out of the sides when you print)
  • Print into the shapes of your grid by pressing the stamp firmly into the paper. Again think about the direction in which your insects are moving before you start printing (see Carpet Bugs Stamp image)

Image of Moth Design
Drawing Moths and Bugs

Drawing Moths and Bugs

 

Carpet Bugs Template Image
Carpet Bugs (template)

Carpet Bugs (template)

 

Carpet Moths Image
Carpet Moths 1

Carpet Moths 1

 

Carpet Moths 2 Image
Carpet Moths 2

Carpet Moths 2

 

Bees Image
Bees

Bees

 

Hopper carpet pattern
Hopper Carpet

Hopper Carpet

 

Stamp of a bug
Bug Stamp

Bug Stamp

 

Carpet Bug Stamp Image
Carpet Bugs (stamp)

Carpet Bugs (stamp)