The First National Lottery

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  • Intro

    This is an advertisement for England’s first ever National Lottery. It was issued in 1567 by Queen Elizabeth I. At this time England was seeking to expand its export markets around the world. The lottery was intended to raise money for the enormous costs of building ships and developing ports. Tickets cost ten shillings each – far too much for the ordinary citizen to afford. The first prize was an amazing £5000, which was paid partly in ‘ready money’ and partly in plate, tapestries and ‘good linen cloth’. To encourage as many people as possible to buy tickets, all ticket holders were promised freedom from arrest for all crimes other than murder, felonies, piracy or treason.

  • Transcript

    The Great Lottery

    A very rich Lotterie generall, without any Blanckes, contayning a great number of good Prices, aswel of redy Money as of Plate and certaine sorts of Marchaundizes, having ben valued and priced by the commaundment of the Queenes most excellent Majestie, by men expert and skilfull: and the same Lotterie is erected by hir Majesties order, to the intent that suche commoditie as may chaunce to arise thereof after the charges borne, may be converted towardes the reparation of the Havens, and strength of the Realme, and towardes such other publique good workes. The number of Lots shall be Foure hundreth thousand, and no moe: and every Lot shall be the summe of Tenne shillings sterling onely, and no more.

     

    Three Welcomes.

    THE FIRST person to whome any Lot shal happen, shal have for his welcome (bysides the advauntage of his adventure) the value of fiftie poundes sterling in a  piece of sylver Plate gilte.

    THE SECOND to whome any Lot shall happen, shall have in like case for his welcome (bysydes his adventure) the summe of thirtie poundes in a piece of Plate gilt.

    THE THIRD to whome any price shal happen, shal have for his welcome (bisdies his adventure) the value of twentie pounds in a piece of Plate gilte.

     

    The Prices.

    WHOSOEVER shall winne the greatest and most excellent price, shall receive the value of Five thousande Poundes sterling, that is to say, Three thousande Pounds in ready money, Seven hundreth Poundes in Plate gilte and white, and the rest in good Tapissarie meete for hangings and other covertures, and certaine sortes of good Linnen cloth.

    WHOSOEVER shal winne the second great price, shal have the value of Three thousand and five hundreth Pounds, that is to say, Two thousand Poundes in ready Money, Six hundreth Poundes in Plate gilt and white, and the rest in good Tapissarie and Linnen cloth.

    WHOSOEVER shall winne the third great price, shal have the value of Three thousand Poundes, that is to say, A thousand & Five hundreth Pounds in readie Money, Five hundreth Poundes in Plate gilt and white, and the rest in good Tapissarie and Linnen cloth.

    WHOSOEVER shall winne the fourth great price, shal receive the value of Two thousand Poundes, that is to say, that is to say, One thousand Pounds in ready Money, foure hundreth Poundes in Plate gilt and white, and the rest in good Tapissarie and Linnen cloth.

    WHOSOEVER shal winne the fifth great price, shal receive the value of One thousande and five hundreth Pounds, that is to say, Seven hundreth and Fiftie Pounds in ready Money, Three hundreth Poundes in Plate gilt and white, and the rest in good Tapissarie and Linnen cloth.

    WHOSOEVER shal winne the sixt great price, shall receive the value of One thousand Pounds, that is to say, Five hundreth Poundes in ready Money, Two hundreth Poundes in Plate gilt and white, and the rest in good Tapissarie and Linnen cloth.

    WHOSOEVER shall winne the seventh great price, shall receive the value of Seven hundreth Poundes, that is to say, Foure hundreth Poundes in ready Money, One hundreth Poundes in Plate gilt and white, and the rest in good Tapissarie and Linnen cloth.

    WHOSOEVER shall winne the eight great price, shall receive the value of Five hundreth Poundes, that is to say, Two hundreh and Fifty Pounds in ready Money, One hundreth Poundes in Plate gilt and white, and the rest in good Tapissarie and Linnen cloth.

    WHOSOEVER shall winne the ninth great price, shall receive the value of Foure hundrth Poundes, that is to say, Two hundreth and Fifty Poundes in ready Money, One hundreth Poundes in Plate gilt and white, and the rest in good Tapissarie and Linnen cloth.

    WHOSOEVER shall winne the tenth great price, shall receive the value of Three hundreth Poundes, that is to say, Two hundreth Poundes in ready Money, Fifty Poundes in Plate, and the rest in good Tapissarie and Linnen cloth.

    WHOSOEVER shall winne the eleventh great price, shall receive the value of Two hundreth and Fiftie Poundes, that is to say, One hundreth and Fiftie Poundes in ready Money, Fiftie Poundes in Plate, and the rest in good Tapissarie and Linnen cloth.

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