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After Hiawatha

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Samuel Coleridge-Taylor at work   Samuel Coleridge-Taylor autographed photo
Samuel Coleridge-Taylor at work
Copyright © Royal College of Music, London
  Samuel Coleridge-Taylor July 1900: the composer's autograph was in great demand
Copyright © Royal College of Music, London
     
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Recommendation to the RPS   Photo of Her (His) Majesty's Theatre

Recommendation to the Royal Philharmonic Society
British Library RPS MS 381, f.1

Copyright © The British Library Board

 

Her Majesty's Theatre in Haymarket where Coleridge-Taylor collaborated with Beerbohm Tree
Copyright © Peter Hughes

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Cartoon drawing    

Watercolour caricature of Coleridge-Taylor by René Bull (1911)
Copyright © Royal College of Music, London

 

The music which followed Hiawatha included the Scenes from an Everyday Romance suite (1900) and the concert overture Toussaint L'Ouverture (1901), but these were not received with the enthusiasm for which he might have hoped. In 1903 the Three Choirs Festival commissioned another choral work, The Atonement. This failed to satisfy the public, which would continue to love Hiawatha's Wedding Feast. Coleridge-Taylor had famously sold the rights to Hiawatha for a flat fee of £25 15s. He received £250 for the two sequels, more than twice his annual income at the time of his death, but he now had a family to support and he needed to continue working.

Between 1898 and 1907 he was chief conductor of the Croydon Symphony Orchestra and resident conductor to the Westmoreland Festival, as well as the Rochester Choral Society. In 1904 he became chief conductor to the Handel Society concerts, a post he held until his death. At the same time he served as guest conductor for performances of Hiawatha (by 1904, it had been performed 200 times in England). He also lectured in Croydon, later joining Trinity College of Music (1903), Crystal Palace School of Art and Music (1905) and then the Guildhall School of Music as professor of composition.

In between jobs he acted as an adjudicator at various festivals and competitions, including the National Eisteddfod of Wales in 1900. At same time he became a frequent collaborator of the actor-manager Herbert Beerbohm Tree at His Majesty's Theatre, and (presumably in his spare time) he also wrote other choral works, as well as pieces for strings and for piano, orchestral works, and an unpublished grand opera (Thelma, 1907-09).

Guest-curated for the British Library by Mike Phillips

Coleridge-Taylor in private Next - 'Coleridge-Taylor in private'

Introduction Introduction
Alexander Pushkin Alexander Pushkin
Alexander Dumas Alexandre Dumas
George Polgreen Bridgetower George Polgreen Bridgetower
Samuel Coleridge-Taylor
Samuel Coleridge-Taylor John Archer
 
 
 
Discover more:
Introduction
Introduction
Alexander Pushkin
Alexander Pushkin
Alexandre Dumas
Alexandre Dumas
George Polgreen Bridgetower
George Polgreen Bridgetower
Samuel Coleridge-Taylor
Background and early life
Background and early life
Early days at the RCM
Early days at the RCM
First successes.... and Hiawatha
First successes... and Hiawatha
After Hiawatha
Coleridge-Taylor in private
Coleridge-Taylor in private
Pan Africanism, race and the USA
Pan-Africanism, race and the USA
The music ends
The music ends
John Archer
John Archer
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