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John Keats' first publication - 'To solitude'

Keats' first published poem appeared in The Examiner, a lively radical weekly newspaper, on 5 May 1816. The sonnet 'To solitude', with its controlled rhythm and youthful echoes of Wordsworth, was a clear indication of his rapidly maturing talent. Signed simply 'J.K.', it attracted little public attention, but Keats was sufficiently encouraged to persevere with his writing; by the end of the year he had decided to give up the practice of medicine.

TO SOLITUDE

O SOLITUDE! If I must with thee dwell,
  Let it not be among the jumbled heap
  Of murky buildings; - climb with me the steep,
Nature's Observatory - whence the dell,
Its flowery slopes - its rivers crystal swell,
  May seem a span: let me thy vigils keep
  'Mongst boughs pavilioned; where the Deer's swift leap
Startles the wild Bee from the Fox-glove bell.
Ah! fain would I frequent such scenes with thee;
  But the sweet converse of an innocent mind,
  Whose words are images of thoughts refin'd,
Is my soul's pleasure; and it sure must be
  Almost the highest bliss of human kind,
When to thy haunts two kindred spirits flee.

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John Keats (1795-1821) John Keats (1795-1821)
Keats' Hyperion Keats' Hyperion
'Ode to a nightingale' 'Ode to a nightingale'
Keats' letter to his sister Keats' letter to his sister
Keats' literary reputation Keats' literary reputation
Keats' first publication - 'To solitude'
   
 
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