The British Library Homepage
homeHome  >   Online Gallery  >   Online exhibitions  >   Features  >   The Lion and Dragon
 
print

The Lion and Dragon: Britain's first embassy to China

Narrative 10: Life of Macartney

Before the Embassy set off, Staunton had procured three Chinese interpreters but they were too afraid to serve on behalf of a foreign power in their own country. Such was the Chinese determination to exclude foreigners at this time that interpreting for foreigners without official accreditation or teaching them Chinese were both capital offences. As Lord Macartney recorded in his diary, the British Protestant Embassy was compelled to rely on Jesuit missionaries of the Catholic Church as interpreters.

However his page, Staunton's son, had learnt some Chinese from the absconding interpreters on their long voyage to China.

Previous
Previous

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12
13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21

Next

Life of Macartney _ Page 214 Life of Macartney _ Page 215 Life of Macartney _ Page 216
Life of Macartney _ Page 217 Life of Macartney _ Page 218 Life of Macartney _ Page 224

John Barrow. Life of Macartney. Vol II. 1807. G1972. pp. 214-218, 224

Top of Page Top of Page

 
 
 
Discover more:
Main
Page by page narratives
Further reading
Accessibility Terms of use Site map
Copyright The British Library Board