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Ghazi al-Din's Mosque (top left), Madrassa of Ghazi al Din Khan (bottom left), Madrassa of Ghazi al Din (top right), Tomb of Ghazi-al Din (bottom right)

Ghazi al-Din's Mosque (top left), Madrassa of Ghazi al Din Khan (bottom left), Madrassa of Ghazi al Din (top right), Tomb of Ghazi-al Din (bottom right)

Author: Metcalfe, Sir Thomas Theophilus (1795-1853)

Medium: Ink and colours on paper

Date: 1843

Shelfmark: Add.Or.5475

Item number: ff. 64v-65

Length: 25.8

Width: 42.3

Scale: Centimetres

Genre: Manuscript

[From 'Reminiscences of Imperial Delhi’, an album consisting of 89 folios containing approximately 130 paintings of views of the Mughal and pre-Mughal monuments of Delhi, as well as other contemporary material, with an accompanying manuscript text written by Sir Thomas Theophilus Metcalfe (1795-1853), the Governor-General’s Agent at the imperial court. Acquired with the assistance of the Heritage Lottery Fund and of the National Art-Collections Fund.]

The mosque attached to the Mudrussa or College outside the City of Dehli
[The mosque of Ghazi al-Din. Ghazi-uddin Khan, who was given the title of Firoz Jang, was an important noble during the reign of Aurangzeb (r.1658-1707) and his successor Shah Alam (r.1707-12). Ghazi uddin's son was Nizam-ul-Mulk, the founder of the Nizam dynasty at Hyderabad. The mosque is a red sandstone building with marble relief work.]
Inscribed: naqsha-i madrasa-i Ghiyas al-Din Haydar.
constructed by the Nawab Ghazeeoodeen Khan (the defender of the Faith) a distinguished nobleman in the reigns of Mohummud Shah and his successor Ahmud Shah. Page 12 [f. 15].
He was the father of the individual of the same name who obtained the chief power in the reign and subsequently caused the murder of the unfortunate Emperor Aulumghure 2nd. Page 46 [f. 50].
[The interior of the quadrangle of the Madrassa. The Madrassa of Ghazi al Din Khan was founded by Ghazi-uddin and is still used as an educational institution. It is now known as the Anglo-Arabic college. The double-storeyed building is constructed around a large courtyard and was entered through an imposing red sandstone gateway.]
Inscribed: maktab-khana maqbara-i Ghiyas al-Din.
South portion of the interior of the Quadrangle.
North portion of the Interior of the Quadrangle.
[The interior of the quadrangle of the Madrassa.]
Inscribed: naqsh-i maktab-khana maqbara-i Ghiyas al-Din
The tomb also situated within the quadrangle is of marble and a very beautiful specimen of Dehly art. It is said to contain the remains of the founder; but the learned in these matters doubt the fact.
Ghazeeoodeen it is well known died at Ahmudabad, in the Deccan, more than
[The tomb of the founder of the Madrassa, Ghazi-al Din Khan. Ghazi-uddin died at Ahmedabad at 1710 and it is believed that his remains were brought and buried in the tomb at the Madrassa, which he founded. The tomb is enclosed by sandstone screens, carved with floral designs. The inner enclosure has three graves, Ghazi-uddin's is the central one.]
Inscribed: naqsha-i maqbara Ghiyad al-Din andarun-i masjid.
400 miles from Dehly. But history also asserts that his remains were brought to the Imperial City and if so no sepulchre could have been more fitting or more likely to be selected, than the one in question.

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