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The marble enclosure round the grave of the Emperor Muhammad Shah at Nizamuddin (top right),The marble enclosure round the grave of Mirza Jahangir (bottom right)

The marble enclosure round the grave of the Emperor Muhammad Shah at Nizamuddin (top right),The marble enclosure round the grave of Mirza Jahangir (bottom right)

Author: Metcalfe, Sir Thomas Theophilus (1795-1853)

Medium: Ink and colours on paper

Date: 1843

Shelfmark: Add.Or.5475

Item number: ff. 44v-45

Length: 25.8

Width: 42.3

Scale: Centimetres

Genre: Manuscript

[From 'Reminiscences of Imperial Delhi’, an album consisting of 89 folios containing approximately 130 paintings of views of the Mughal and pre-Mughal monuments of Delhi, as well as other contemporary material, with an accompanying manuscript text written by Sir Thomas Theophilus Metcalfe (1795-1853), the Governor-General’s Agent at the imperial court. Acquired with the assistance of the Heritage Lottery Fund and of the National Art-Collections Fund.]

Within the enclosure of Nizamodeen’s Tomb are the annexed Cenotaphs both of marble and though executed at very different periods, they are both exquisite specimens of Oriental designs and perfect execution.
The one is sacred to the memory of the unfortunate Emperor Mohummud Shah, referred to in page 12 [f. 15]. The lattice work of the screen is incomparable and the massive slab of which the door way is composed most beautifully carved.
The second is of much modern date though equally admired having been erected in the year 1821 to the memory of the Prince Juhangeer (the Conqueror of the World) the 4th son of late Emperor Akber Shah.
This dissipated and turbulent scion of the Royal House evinced all the characteristics, had he but possessed the power of a 2nd Absalom, and yet strange to say of all the sons he was the most cherished. Like also to the great Aurungzeb he endeavoured to supplant his elder brother and strongly encouraged and supported by his father, he would but from [for?] the protecting arm of the British Government, in all human probability have succeeded.
As it was in the year 1809 he created a serious disturbance within the Palace, in the hope, that during this confusion, the destruction not only of the hated brother but the unsuspecting father might have ensured his own aggrandizement. Stringent measures were now deemed necessary to prevent more serious consequences; and the rebellious Prince was banished to the Fortress of Allahabad (the City of God) where he remained a State prisoner until in 1820, he closed a life of the grossest intemperance. His remains were transferred to Dehly and here deposited.
[The marble enclosure round the grave of the Emperor Muhammad Shah (r.1719-48) at Nizamuddin.]
Inscribed: naqsha-i qabr-i Muhammad Shah Badshah andarun-i dargah-i Nizam al-Din.
[The marble enclosure round the grave of Mirza Jahangir (d. 1819), the favourite son of the Emperor Akbar II (r.1806-37), at Nizamuddin.]
Inscribed: naqsha-i maqbara-i Jahangir Bahadur dar Nizam al-Din. ‘amal-i Mazhar ‘Ali Khan.

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