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The Dargah or Shrine of Shah Sharaf al-Din Bu ‘Ali Qalandar situated at Panipat, with the adjacent tomb of Muqarrab Khan

The Dargah or Shrine of Shah Sharaf al-Din Bu ‘Ali Qalandar situated at Panipat, with the adjacent tomb of Muqarrab Khan

Author: Metcalfe, Sir Thomas Theophilus (1795-1853)

Medium: Ink and colours on paper

Date: 1843

Shelfmark: Add.Or.5475

Item number: ff. 54v-55

Length: 25.8

Width: 42.3

Scale: Centimetres

Genre: Manuscript

[From 'Reminiscences of Imperial Delhi’, an album consisting of 89 folios containing approximately 130 paintings of views of the Mughal and pre-Mughal monuments of Delhi, as well as other contemporary material, with an accompanying manuscript text written by Sir Thomas Theophilus Metcalfe (1795-1853), the Governor-General’s Agent at the imperial court. Acquired with the assistance of the Heritage Lottery Fund and of the National Art-Collections Fund.]

The Durgah or Shrine of Shah (‘literally King, but also applied to Holy Men of Great Sanctity’) Shurufoodeen (‘The Glory of Religion’) Boo-Ulee (‘ No literal signification, also the name of a celebrated physician long antecedent to the subject of the present memoir’) Kullundur (‘a description of religious devotee, corrupted in the English translate of the Arabian Nights to Calendar’) situated at Paneeput about 50 miles to the north of Dehly. Shurufoodeen was a native of Irak Babylon, and when about 42 years of age, accompanied his father to Dehly in the reign of the Emperor Allaoodeen (‘The Glory of Religion, corrupted into Aladin in the story of the wonderful lamp, in the Arabian Nights’) Mushood (‘Good Renown’) Shah, who flourished AD [blank, reg. AD1242-46], and established himself as a Professor of languages and theology, and there he continued for 20 years. At this period of his age, tradition asserts that he was blessed by the Almighty in a vision, and that throwing all his books into the river and distributing his worldly goods in charity he became a religious devotee and for 40 years travelled through the world and then again returned to Paneeput. Allaoodeen Khilzee (‘name of a dynasty’) was now the reigning Prince AD 1311, and he at Shurufoodeen’e request built the greater portion of the shrine at an expense of 55,000 Rupees of £5,500. Shurufoodeen died at Kurnaul AD 1324, and his immediate followers and disciples thought proper to enter his remains at that place. As it is contrary to the Mohummudan tenets to disinter a body, his relatives and friends who had intended that he should be buried at Paneeput
[The Dargah or Shrine of Shah Sharaf al-Din Bu ‘Ali Qalandar situated at Panipat, with the adjacent tomb of Muqarrab Khan.]
Inscribed: naqsha-i dargah hazrat Bu ‘Ali Qalandar dar Panipat. ‘amal-i Mazhar ‘Ali Khan.
brought from Kurnaul with much solemnity a brick taken from the monument thence, and deposited it within the sepulchre prepared for the remains. It is however a disputed point to the present day whether the Paneeput or Kurnaul Shrine contains the remains. Two villages yielding an annual revenue of Rs4000 or £400 were originally assigned for the maintenance of the Shrine at Paneeput, and the British Government now pay annually 2200 Rupees on this account.

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