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Tombs of Nawab Muhammad Amin Khan and his son Qamar al-Din Khanat the Madrassa of Delhi (left), An artillery man on camel back (right)

Tombs of Nawab Muhammad Amin Khan and his son Qamar al-Din Khanat the Madrassa of Delhi (left), An artillery man on camel back (right)

Author: Metcalfe, Sir Thomas Theophilus (1795-1853)

Medium: Ink and colours on paper

Date: 1843

Shelfmark: Add.Or.5475

Item number: ff. 65v-66

Length: 25.8

Width: 42.3

Scale: Centimetres

Genre: Manuscript

[From 'Reminiscences of Imperial Delhi’, an album consisting of 89 folios containing approximately 130 paintings of views of the Mughal and pre-Mughal monuments of Delhi, as well as other contemporary material, with an accompanying manuscript text written by Sir Thomas Theophilus Metcalfe (1795-1853), the Governor-General’s Agent at the imperial court. Acquired with the assistance of the Heritage Lottery Fund and of the National Art-Collections Fund.]

The Tombs of the Newab Mohumud (‘Praised’) Umeen (‘Faithful’2) Khan (‘Lord’) and his son Kumroodeen (‘Light of the Faith’) Khan at Dehlie.
They were both natives of Toorkistan and came to Hindoostan during the reign of the Emperor Alumgheer (‘Conqueror of the World’) Aurungzebe (‘Ornament of the Throne’), who flourished between the years AD 1658 and 1707 and on being presented at the court of that Monarch, the former was honored with the title of Khan, and raised first to the command of 2000 and subsequently to that of 5000 horse, a dignity of no common order, which he continued

[The tombs of Muhammad Amin Khan and of his son Qamar al-Din Khan in the enclosure of Ghazi-ud-Din's madrassa now called the Anglo-Arabic School.]

Inscribed: naqsha-i maqbara Nawab Qamar al-Din Khan.
to enjoy until the reign of Furookh Seer (‘Of happy or virtuous habits’) AD 1713 when he was appointed Bukshee or Pay Master of the 2nd Grade. In the reign of the Emperor Mohumud Shah, page 12 [f. 15] having succeeded in effecting the assassination of Hoosain (‘Virtuous’) Ullie Khan the Umeer ool Omrah (‘Chief of the Nobility’), he was advanced to the dignities of Wuzeer or Prime Minister with additional titles of higher order, and his son was appointed to the Pay Mastership vacant by his father’s promotion.
Mohumud Umeen Khan died in AD 1722 and after a short interval
was succeeded in his office by his son Kumroodeen Khan. The latter was killed in the action fought at Sirhind AD 1740 ([i.e. 1748] page 24 [f. 28]) between Ahmud Shah the Afghan Ruler and the Emperor of Hindoostan of the same name. Both father and son are buried within the same enclosure and contiguous to the Mudrussa of Ghazeeoodeen Khan (page 64 [f. 65]). The tombs of both are beautiful though now much dilapidated. They were built by their respective sons.
[Man on a camel with a large gun.]
Inscribed: naqsh-i zanburak.
Camel Artillery man, employed also in carrying expresses.

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