Click here to skip to content

Dungaye Hill at the end of the Dungaye Pass (Bihar) looking S.; a wayside shrine and ascetic in foreground. 18 February 1823

Dungaye Hill at the end of the Dungaye Pass (Bihar) looking S.; a wayside shrine and ascetic in foreground. 18 February 1823

Artist: D'Oyly, Sir Charles (1781-1845)

Medium: Pen and ink on paper

Date: 1823

Shelfmark: WD2060

Item number: f34

Length: 26

Width: 36

Scale: Centimetres

Genre: Drawing

Pen and ink drawing by Sir Charles D'Oyly (1781-1845), of Dungaye Hill at the end of the Dungaye Pass in Bihar, from an Album of 80 drawings of views in Bengal and Bihar taken between January 1823 and May 1825. The largest group (ff.2-39) consists of sketches made between 26 January and 27 February 1823 during a journey from Calcutta to Gaya (Bihar) along the 'New Military Road'. This road passed through Manbhum district (Bihar) to Hazaribagh (Bihar) and through the hills to the N.W. to join the present Grand Trunk Road near Sherghati (Gaya district, Bihar). Begun in 1782, it had semaphore signalling towers built along it in the early years of the 19th century.

This is the original drawing for plate 12 of 'Sketches of the New Road in a Journey from Calcutta to Gyah' (Calcutta, 1830). D'Oyly wrote, "This is another singularly beautiful pass, very different in character from the other. As in the Kutkumsundee Pass, the traveller comes at once on the top of a very steep descent, and looks down on a scarcely less picturesque view. Though the scenery is more confined. It is formed of a high rocky Hill, from the summit of which projects some sharp angular masses of stone, and under a natural parapet is seen a dense forest of Bamboo Trees gracefully waving their light branches in the breeze, and at the particular time when this view was taken: of every autumnal hue that can be imagined. The one represented here, is when emerging from the pass the bluff edge of the range is seen. On the left of the road is a rude shrine, where the native Travellers pray for protection in their perilous journeyings, and support an old fakier, who is generally found on the roadside. The distance of this pass from Calcutta is 178 miles."

Search within this collection

Elsewhere on our websites

Newsletter

Latest events - register free online

Mobile app

For iPhone, iPad and Android

Report a Concern

What is the nature of your concern?

Report a Concern

What is the nature of your concern?

Email link to a friend

Write a brief note to accompany the email

Your friend's email address: