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General view of the Sangat Mahal at Torweh, near Bijapur.

General view of the Sangat Mahal at Torweh, near Bijapur.

Photographer: Cousens, Henry

Medium: Photographic print

Date: 1880

Shelfmark: Photo 1003/(1865)

Item number: 10031865

Length: 200

Width: 266

Scale: Millimetres

Genre: Photograph

Photograph of the Sangat Mahal at Torweh, near Bijapur taken by Henry Cousens in the 1880s. Bijapur is one of the most important Islamic cities in India. In the fifteenth century it was the centre of a powerful state; the Bijapur sultans owned land stretching from Goa to northern India. Some of the more famous monuments at the city include the Jami Masjid, the Gol Gumbaz and the Asar Mahal. In 1599, a new city was founded four miles west of Bijapur by Ibrahim Adil Shah II. It was abandoned soon afterwards but not before a number of monumental buildings were erected. The Sangat Mahal was built around this time and is described by Burgess in 'The Antiquarian Remains of the Bombay Presidency' : "a duplicate of this building [the Gagan Mahal], though not quite so large, the roof of which is in great part remaining, and here may be studied the manner in which the Gagan Mahal was roofed over." The Gagan Mahal stands in Bijapur, incorporates two courts and was used by the sultan and his harem.

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