Click here to skip to content

Kashmir. Part of the colonnade of Temple at Bhaniar on the road between Uri and Naoshera. The Temple probably dedicated to the goddess 'Bhawani,' the wife of 'Siva.' Probable date A.D. 500 to 600 (?)

Kashmir. Part of the colonnade of Temple at Bhaniar on the road between Uri and Naoshera. The Temple probably dedicated to the goddess 'Bhawani,' the wife of 'Siva.' Probable date A.D. 500 to 600 (?)

Photographer: Burke, John

Medium: Photographic print

Date: 1868

Shelfmark: Photo 981/1(22)

Item number: 22

Length: 17.7

Width: 22.6

Scale: Centimetres

Genre: Photograph

Photograph of the peristyle of the Vishnu temple at Buniyar, on the road between Uri and Naoshera, in Jammu and Kashmir, taken by John Burke in 1868. This view shows a section of the colonnade, with arched recesses between each column. Buniyar, on the banks of the Vitasta (Jhelum) has one of the best-preserved temple remnants in Kashmir. The small main temple stands on a two-tier plinth, it has an entrance on one side and recesses on the other three sides, all framed by pedimented trefoils. It dates from the late-9th to early 10th century. It is set within a square court composed of colonnaded cells, 53 in number, and showing the characteristic Kashmiri architectural feature of trefoil arches set within triangular pediments standing on pilasters. This photograph is reproduced in Henry Hardy Cole's Archaeological Survey of India report, 'Illustrations of Ancient buildings in Kashmir' (1869), in which he wrote, 'This Temple is of great interest, as it shows at a glance what form all those of Kashmir took. It is the most perfect in the valley...Bhaniyar is on the left bank of the Jhelum, about 1¾ beyond Naoshera, and is on the road leading out of Kashmir towards Murree. At present the temple is occupied by an old Hindu Fakeer, who asserts that the building dates some thousands of years ago, and was the work of the Pandus, a race of giants...Some few years ago, this temple was completely embedded in the earth, which had been washed down from the mountains behind it. The Raja of Kashmir had it excavated, and at present, the colonnade is quite perfect.'

Search within this collection

Elsewhere on our websites

Newsletter

Latest events - register free online

Mobile app

For iPhone, iPad and Android

Report a Concern

What is the nature of your concern?

Report a Concern

What is the nature of your concern?

Email link to a friend

Write a brief note to accompany the email

Your friend's email address: