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No. 9. Mosque at Meerut said to be the principal resort of the mutineers.

No. 9. Mosque at Meerut said to be the principal resort of the mutineers.

Photographer: Tytler, Robert and Harriet

Medium: Photographic print

Date: 1858

Shelfmark: Photo 32/(16)

Item number: 16

Length: 36.3

Width: 47.4

Scale: Centimetres

Genre: Photograph

Photograph of a mosque at Meerut, taken by Major Robert Christopher Tytler and his wife, Harriet, in the aftermath of the Uprising of 1857. Meerut was a garrison town about sixty km from Delhi. In May 1857 a British command court-martialled eighty-five sepoys for not using their rifle cartridges. The sepoys had refused to use the cartridges as they were rumoured to be made with pig and cow fat, which had to be bitten with their teeth. This was against both the Islamic and Hindu religion. This event sparked an Uprising, at a time of already unsettled relations between the Indians and British rule. The Uprising lasted thirteen months: from the rising of Meerut on 10 May 1857 to the fall of Gwalior on 20 June 1858.

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