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Thapinyoo [Thatbyinnyu] Pagoda, Pagan, Upper Burma, built about the year A.D. 1100

Thapinyoo [Thatbyinnyu] Pagoda, Pagan, Upper Burma, built about the year A.D. 1100

Photographer: Jackson, J.

Medium: Photographic print

Date: 1868

Shelfmark: Photo 1099/(38)

Item number: 109938

Genre: Photograph

Photograph of the Thatbyinnyu Pagoda at Pagan (Bagan) taken by J. Jackson in c.1868, part of an album of 43 views of Burma (Myanmar) from the Sladen Collection. This magnificent and beautiful temple stands within the city walls of old Pagan. Its name is derived from the Burmese word ‘Rhatbyinnutanyan,’ meaning omniscience. It was built by King Alaungsithu (1113-1163) and is of architectural importance as one of the earliest double-storey temples dating from the 12th-century Middle Period of temple building in Pagan. It is square in plan with porticoes on all four sides. Three receding terraces rise above each storey, ornamented with crenellated parapets and corner stupas. It is crowned with a stupa and at 210 feet high is one of the tallest monuments of Pagan. It is renowned for its fine brickwork and the panoramic views of Bagan from its terraces. The temple is one of more than 2000 surviving Buddhist monuments built by kings, nobles and monks as meritorious acts on the plain at Pagan on the eastern bank of the Irrawaddy (Ayeyarwady) river in central Burma. Most date from the period of Pagan’s golden age, between the 11th and the 13th centuries when it was a royal city and the capital of an extensive Burmese kingdom.

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