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Newcourt's 'Map of London', detail showing the East End

Newcourt's 'Map of London', detail showing the East End

Cartographer: Newcourt, Richard

Medium: Engraving

Date: 1658

Shelfmark: Maps.R17.a.3

Item number: detail

Genre: Map

Map scale ratio: 14 " : 1 Stat. Mile (1 : 4525)

Map scale description: 6 1/4 ' : 900 yards

Richard Newcourt’s map, made in 1658, represents the first complete survey of London since the 1550s. It shows the City and its surrounding countryside in the closing years of the Commonwealth.

Though most buildings are depicted in a conventionalised way, the map gives some idea of the actual appearance of more important places, such as churches and livery halls. The inclusion of their coats of arms in the map's decoration suggests the Livery Companies may have commissioned Newcourt's work.

The map provides a fairly accurate picture of the development of the City's eastern suburbs, already spreading along the roads that reached out across the countryside towards the surrounding villages. As well as being the docklands of London, this was the area where the first native English school of chartmaking, the so-called 'Thames School', was getting underway at the very time this map was made.

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