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Dryburgh Abbey 182

Dryburgh Abbey 182

Photographer: Thompson, Stephen

Medium: Photographic print

Date: 1864

Shelfmark: C.44.d.7,8

Item number: 182

Genre: Photograph

“A monastery belonging to the canons of the Premonstratensian Order (Norbertine or White Canons), situated four miles south-east of Melrose, Scotland. It was founded about 1150 by Hugo de Morville, Constable of Scotland, who brought a community from Alnwick in Northumberland. The situation is beautiful, a wooded promontory, around three sides of which sweeps the River Tweed. The church was dedicated to the Blessed Virgin. The monastery was burnt to the ground by Edward II, who encamped in the grounds when retreating from Scotland in 1322; but it was restored under Robert I, who himself contributed largely. At the Dissolution it was created a temporal lordship, and conferred by James VI on the Earl of Mar...
The general style of the existing remains of Dryburgh is Early English, with some older (Norman) work...The principal object of interest to visitors is the tomb of Sir Walter Scott, in St. Mary's Aisle (part of the north transept). Sir Walter's maternal ancestors, the Haliburtons, at one time owned Dryburgh. His wife and eldest son are also interred here.”


Excerpt from “Dryburgh Abbey”, in ‘Ruined Abbeys and Castles of Great Britain and Ireland’ by William Howitt.

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