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Croesus And The Miraculous Rain, In John Lydgate's 'The Fall Of Princes'

Croesus And The Miraculous Rain, In John Lydgate's 'The Fall Of Princes'

Medium: Ink, pigments and gold on vellum

Date: 1455

Shelfmark: Harley MS 1766

Item number: f.133r

Length: 30

Width: 20.5

Scale: Centimetres

Genre: Illuminated manuscript

John Lydgate (c.1370-c.1450) was probably born at Lidgate in Suffolk; he became a monk of Bury St. Edmunds aged 15, a priest in 1397, and during a long life was a remarkably prolific writer of English verse. 'The Fall of Princes' is a translation into English, made in about 1438/9, of a French work of c.1409, which was itself a translation of a mid 14th-century work in Latin by an Italian, Giovanni Boccaccio (1313-75). It concerns men who rise to great power, and their subsequent downfall: a warning to readers of the fickle nature of fate. King Croesus is famed for his great wealth. In Greek mythology he is said to have been saved from being burnt on a pyre when a miraculous rain-cloud extinguished the fire.

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