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The Ibex And The Hyena, In A Bestiary

The Ibex And The Hyena, In A Bestiary

Medium: Ink and pigments on vellum

Date: 1235

Shelfmark: Harley MS 4751

Item number: f.10r

Length: 30.1

Width: 22.5

Scale: Centimetres

Genre: Illuminated manuscript

In addition to their often attractive illustrations, bestiaries are appealing because--with their combination of real and misunderstood facts, fantasy, and religious interpretation--they seem to offer us a window into the medieval person's view of the natural world. They have traditionally described by scholars in terms of being natural history books, but recent research has shown that from the 12th century onwards the bestiary was used largely as a source of theological inspiration for sermons, rather than for information about animals. This copy is related to other manuscripts which may have been made in Salisbury. The ibex was thought to have such strong horns that if it fell headlong from a high mountain its whole body would be supported by the horns. The hyena was thought to live off dead bodies, which it might steal from tombs in graveyards.

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