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A South East View of the cathedral Church of St. Peter in Exeter

A South East View of the cathedral Church of St. Peter in Exeter

Engraver: Jukes, F.

Medium: Aquatint

Date: 1792

Shelfmark: K Top Vol 11

Item number: 69l

Length: 33.5

Width: 46.9

Scale: Centimetres

Genre: Topographical Print

South West view of Exeter Cathedral in Devon. The site is ancient and contained a Saxon monastic church since the later 7th century. The church was rebuilt after it was burned down by the Danes, and in 1050 it was made a cathedral by Bishop Lori. The Norman Bishop William Warelwast replaced the Saxon building, beginning c.1112. His huge transept towers survive, as can be seen in this picture. In Walter Bronescombe, Bishop between 1257-80, demolished most of the Norman building and rebuilt it in the Gothic Decorated style. The rebuilding continued over the next 100 years under several new bishops and master masons. The resulting building has the longest unbroken span of Gothic vaulting. At 69 feet it is comparable with many English cathedrals but no where near as tall as the Gothic French Cathedrals.

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