Click here to skip to content

Vue de l'Isle de Staffa, de Cote du Sud, avec l'entree de la Grotte de Shag

Vue de l'Isle de Staffa, de Cote du Sud, avec l'entree de la Grotte de Shag

Artist: Horney, C.

Medium: Aquatint, coloured

Date: 1800

Shelfmark: K.top Vol. 49

Item number: 39.b

Genre: Topographical Print

View of the Island of Staffa. Situated off the west coast of Scotland, between Mull and the Treshnish Islands, Staffa is small and uninhabited. It is just three quarters of a mile in length and a quarter of a mile in width. The island is geographically unique and is made up of basalt columns in hexagonal shapes. It is thought that the name Staffa originates from the old Norse word ‘stafr’ which means pillar. The island is also known for its five caves- named Fingal's, Cormorant's, Mckinnon's, Clamshell and Boat. The largest of these if Fingal’s Cave which derives its name from the Irish hero Fionn MacCoul who defended the Hebrides against pirate attacks. The cave's Gaelic name is ‘An Uamh Bin’n which translates as 'The Melodious Cave'.

Search within this collection

Elsewhere on our websites

Newsletter

Latest events - register free online

Mobile app

For iPhone, iPad and Android

Report a Concern

What is the nature of your concern?

Report a Concern

What is the nature of your concern?

Email link to a friend

Write a brief note to accompany the email

Your friend's email address: