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Vue de l'Isle de Staffa du cote du Nord-Ouest, avex entree de la Grotte de Cormorants, et de celle de fingal

Vue de l'Isle de Staffa du cote du Nord-Ouest, avex entree de la Grotte de Cormorants, et de celle de fingal

Artist: Horney, C.

Medium: Aquatint

Date: 1800

Shelfmark: K.top Vol. 49

Item number: 39.c

Genre: Topographical Print

View of the Island of Staffa. The name Staffa is thought to have originated from the Norse word ‘stafr’ which means Pillar and this refers to the hexagonal basalt columns which cover the island. The first printed reference to Staffa Island is in Geroge Buchanan’s ‘History of Scotland’, printed in 1582, however he makes no mention of the unusual geological features of the island and it was not until 1772 when Joseph Banks discovered the island. The island is known for its five caves of which Fingal's Cave is the largest at 227 feet long and 66 feet high. The cave was an inspiration for Mendelssohn’s overture as well as for artists such as Turner and writers such as Keats and Wordsworth.

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