Click here to skip to content

Legalising the drugs trade: reducing crime or increasing addiction?

A guide to books, journals and websites relevant to debates about the formulation and enforcement of policies on the trade in illegal drugs. This guide has been written to provide background information and sources for the Speakers Corner Trust Forum for Debate, titled 'Legalising the drugs trade: reducing crime or increasing addiction?'. 

Forum for Debate

The British Library is providing background information and sources for further reading about each topic featured in Speakers’ Corner Trust’s Forum for Debate.

The focus of each bibliography will be on recent work that is accessible to someone with a general interest in the topic. All of the references in this resource guide are to materials that are either available without charge through the internet, or that may be accessed at the Library Reading Rooms in London.

Speakers’ Corner Trust is a registered charity which promotes free expression and public debate. The Forum for Debate series is intended to cover issues of general public interest, with invited contributions from policy workers, commentators, academics and campaigners on either side of the debate. More information can be found on the Speakers’ Corner website at: http://www.speakerscornertrust.org/forum/forum-for-debate/

The topic: Legalising the Drugs Trade: Reducing Crime or Increasing Addiction – July 2010

This resource guide provides details of books, journals and reports that can be found in the British Library. Many can also be accessed online. There are also links to sources of statistics on the scale and impact of illegal drug use and other useful web resources on drug control and addiction treatment.

The materials included in this guide cover topics relating to:

  • assessment of recent UK, US and international policy on drug control and treatment;
  • ways of measuring the prevalence of drug use in the UK;
  • the impact of illegal drug use on individuals, families, communities and society;
  • the limits of prohibition in controlling the trade in illegal drugs; and
  • alternatives to prohibition, such as decriminalisation or legal regulation.

Please note that the British Library neither endorses, nor can be held responsible for, any information provided by external websites or publications listed herein.  

PDF files

This page contains links to Adobe PDF files. Accessibility solutions and free 'Reader' software are available from Adobe.

PDF files

The links below are to Adobe PDF files. Accessibility solutions and free Reader software are available from Adobe.