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Welfare Reform on the Web (March 1999): Child Welfare - Overseas

BUILDING SUPPORTIVE COMMUNITIES FOR AT RISK ADOLESCENTS: IT TAKES MORE THAN SERVICES

M. R. Burt, G. Resnick and E. R. Novick
Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, 1998

Authors offer an exhaustive review of the literature on youth development conveying the nuances of the differing perspectives and world views. Emphasise the wide differences in local situations, which mean that every community faces different terrain when setting out to organise services. From an American perspective, they make clear the number of dimensions and disciplines that have to integrate and co-operate to serve effectively, and the complicated organizational and bureaucratic issues which arise as a result.

CHILDREN AND SOCIAL WELFARE IN EUROPE

K. Pringle
Buckingham: Open University Press, 1998

Draws together material on welfare benefits, parental leave, day care resources, and social care provision across Europe, including Eastern Europe and pan-European institutions such as the European Union. Offers a critique of mainstream welfare frameworks on the grounds that they not only ignore issues of gender, but also those of race, age, sexuality and disability.

CREATING CHILD-FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENTS: CASE STUDIES ON CHILDREN'S PARTICIPATION IN THREE EUROPEAN COUNTRIES

L. Horelli
Childhood, vol. 5, no. 2, May 1998, p. 225-239

Case studies in Finland, Switzerland and France indicate that the creation of child-friendly environments with young people means a shift towards more ecological and socially supportive settings with opportunities for the involvement of different groups. Preconditions for children's involvement in neighbourhood improvement comprise, besides the appropriate tools for participation, adequate institutional arrangements within the school and the municipality which make space for the participation of children and young people. The role of local government and even the state is crucial.

FAMILY TO FAMILY: RECONSTRUCTING FOSTER CARE IN THE US

J. B. Mattingley
Children and Society, vol. 12, no. 3, June 1998, p. 180-184

The Family to Family Initiative in the US offers public agencies funds and tools to help them strengthen family support services within the communities from which the children enter the system, improve the quality and quantity of neighbourhood-based foster homes, and develop the capacity to collect and manage outcome data.

STATE REGULATION AND CHILD CARE CHOICE

S. L. Hufferth and D. D. Chaplin
Population Research and Policy Review, vol. 17, no. 2, April 1998, p. 111-140

Government regulations may alter the cost and availability of child care, thus affecting parental use of such services. Analysis of data from the US National Child Care Survey 1990 showed strong evidence that state regulations requiring centre-based providers to be trained was associated with a lower probability that parents choose a centre, while state inspections are associated with more parental choice of centre and home care.

YOUNG UNWED FATHERS OF AFDC CHILDREN: DO THEY PROVIDE SUPPORT?

A. Rangarajan and P. Gleason
Demography, vol. 5, no. 2, May 1998, p. 175-186

Study examines support provided by fathers of children born to disadvantaged teenage mothers in the US. Results show that young absent fathers provide little economic or social support to their children or the mothers. Support provided tends to diminish as the child gets older or if the relationship with the mother is distant. Fathers who are employed or better educated are more likely to provide economic support, but these factors do not appear to influence the amount of social support given.

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