Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (March 1999): Social Security - UK - New Deal

NEW DEAL FOR UNEMPLOYED

R. McLuhan
Personnel To-day, 18 June 1998, p. 25-26

Reports early success of the Government's New Deal Programme for the young unemployed. Companies are establishing strong links with the Employment Service to ensure that recruits arrive job-ready. The Employment Service personal adviser will identify factors inhibiting the unemployed person from getting work, and will provide special needs training. The adviser will also support the client through the first six months on the employment option.

"DYNAMIC TESTING" REVEALS REAL ABILITIES OF DROP-OUTS

J. Pickard
People Management, vol. 4, no. 11, 28 May 1998, p. 11

The hidden potential of young people who have dropped out of education and employment is being brought to light using a new approach to psychometric testing. A small trial with 5 New Deal clients has shown a significant gap between their conventional test scores and their ability to tackle problems after being taught how to solve them.

THE NEW DEAL AND FOYERS

C. Hayman
London: Foyer Federation for Youth, 1998

Suggests that there is a risk that the New Deal may, in some areas, fail to address social exclusion unless organisations with a track record of working effectively with disadvantaged young people are given a much stronger front line role. This should include actively recruiting young people on to the New Deal and giving them close support throughout their time on it.

NEW DEAL FOR JOBLESS AGED OVER 25 LAUNCHED

A. Bolger
Financial Times, 29th June 1998, p. 6

Announces launch of New Deal programme for those over 25 with a campaign to persuade employers to recruit older long-term unemployed people. Employers who take on a long-term unemployed person aged 25 or more will qualify for a government subsidy of up to £75.00 per week for 6 months. The government will launch 30 pilot schemes for the older long-term unemployed in November. These will require participation in one of the programme's training or employment options for three months. Anyone refusing to do so will face loss of benefit.

(See also Independent, 30th June 1998, p. 10)

THE NEW DEAL HANDBOOK

C. Donnelly, M Nimmo and P. Convery
London: Unemployment Unit and Youthaid, 1998.

Covers key elements of the New Deal for the young unemployed:

  • eligibility and recruitment;
  • the Gateway (supporting young people to become "option ready");
  • referral to New Deal options; the four options (environmental task force;
  • work with voluntary organisation; a job with an employer and full time education);
  • leaving the New Deal and the follow-through strategy;
  • the relationship between the New Deal and benefits regulations, particularly in terms of sanctions.
Search Welfare Reform on the Web