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Welfare Reform on the Web (March 1999): Welfare State - UK

AN INCLUSIVE SOCIETY: STRATEGIES FOR TACKLING POVERTY

C. Oppenheim (editor)
London: Institute for Public Policy Research, 1998

Explores new strategies for tackling poverty which will have to take account of globalisation, changes in the labour market and family life and a shift in how the individual sees his/her place in society with a greater role for autonomy, choice and risk. The development of new political institutions from the European level to the locality, the restructuring of the welfare state with greater roles for the private and voluntary sectors, the extension of the market into new areas such as the utilities and public transport and the ambiguity of public support for traditional forms of income redistribution involve a rethinking of the policy levers to address poverty and social exclusion.

LABOUR'S TEMPLE TO THE PAST

P. Riddell
Times, 29th June 1998, p.20

Argues that money alone will not build better public services without organisational restructuring to foster competition, comparison and delegated responsibility.

THE NEW SOCIAL GLUE: WHICH BRAND?

P. Pahl and H. Tam
Local Government Voice, vol. 2, issue 1, May 1998, p.9-16

Pahl argues that policy makers should abandon vague notions of community and examine the real relationships which bind people together. Traditional family relationships may be declining, but friends and neighbours are playing an increasingly supportive role. Understanding the quality of people's relationships will lead to practical, useful politics - the better the quality of the relationships, the less need for state support. Tam agrues that the rhetoric of community should give way to a precise policy framework on the kind of community to be promoted. Government should reform power structures so that oppressive and fragmentary community relationships are replaced by a truly inclusive form of community life.

UNSETTLING WELFARE: THE RECONSTRUCTION OF SOCIAL POLICY

G. Hughes and C. Lewis (editors)
London: Routledge, 1998

Explores the remaking of the welfare state in the UK at the end of the twentieth century. Treating the welfare state as a social and political construction, it examines the break up and reconstruction of the relationship between the state and social welfare. Includes focused studies on housing, education, probation, social care, health and income maintenance.

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