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Welfare Reform on the Web (April 2000): Social Security - UK - New Deal

ELEVEN EMPLOYMENT ZONE CONTRACTS AGREED

P. Convery

Working Brief, Dec. 1999/Jan. 2000, p.10-11

Reports the outcome of the first bidding competition to run the 15 planned Employment Zones from Spring 2000. The government failed to find satisfactory bidders in four of the 15 zones. The zones will offer participants a 'full personal adviser service' where claimant and adviser will decide together how funds pooled into a Personal Job Account can be used to create a tailor-made package of assistance.

EMPLOYERS TO GET NEW DEAL SUBSIDY FOR TWICE AS LONG

D. Coyle and P. Waugh

Independent, Jan. 11th 2000, p.8

The financial incentives for employers to take on young people under New Deal are to be paid for 12 months rather than the present six. The "three strikes and you're out" benefit cuts will be extended to everyone on the scheme. The changes are intended to make the New Deal more responsive to the needs of the employers.

(See also Financial Times, Jan. 11th 2000, p.3).

FOCUSING ON UNEMPLOYED ADULTS

D. Boyer and P. Bivand

Working Brief, Dec. 1999/Jan. 2000, p.14-16

Changes to programmes for unemployed adults coming into effect over the next two years could become the basis of a more integrated approach. This opportunity arises from three key developments. Firstly, from April 2001, the Work Based Learning for Adults programme will become the responsibility of the Employment Service instead of being run by the TECs. Secondly, at the same time the New Deal for 25+ is to be revamped with lessons from the extended pilots applied nationally. Thirdly, the new single work-focused gateway called ONE, presently in its early pilot stage will, at some point after April 2001, be rolled out and made generally available.

HOME, WORK, FAMILIES AND CHILDREN: NEW LABOUR, NEW DIRECTIONS AND NEW DILEMMAS

M.E. David

International Studies in Sociology of Education, vol. 9, 1999, p.209-229

Article considers the relationship between children, parents and the state in the context of changing global, social and family structures and policy developments, providing a case study of New Labour policies in Britain. The underlying theme of New Labour policies is economic and oriented to work. This involves a rebalancing of home and work and the involvement of parents, especially mothers, in work rather than education or child care. The measures taken to achieve this have been both coercive and controlling and involve new methods of surveillance and regulation through standards. Whilst New Labour has developed a new direction for families in balancing home and work, this is fragmented and diverse and covers a variety of policies from education and social services, to fiscal measures, health and welfare and involving the Home Office in parenting initiatives.

JOBLESS MUST TAKE A COURSE IN HOW TO ANSWER PHONE

P. Waugh

Independent, Jan. 12th 2000, p.2

Reports new measures to help a hard core of unemployed young people who refuse work or who lack the basic skills demanded by companies. The ten-point plan includes new literacy and numcracy tests, lessons on self-presentation and interview techniques and job 'coaches'. Special outreach programmes will also be developed to help people in areas of high employment, deprived neighbourhoods and from ethnic minorities.

(See also Guardian, Jan. 12th 2000, p.7).

NEW DEAL ON JOBS 'FAILING IN NORTH''

M. Ward and C. Clover

Daily Telegraph, Jan. 6th 2000, p.17

Reports research showing that in the depressed North and inner city areas, where unemployment is high, nearly 75% of New Dealers are leaving the jobs or schemes found for them within six months. By contrast in the South East, where unemployment is low and new jobs are being created, a similar number are staying on. What is missing from the New Deal is a method for generating the job necessary for people leaving the scheme to be able to get gainful, secure employment.

(See also Times, Jan. 6th 2000, p.12; Financial Times, Jan. 7th 2000, p.5).

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