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Welfare Reform on the Web (May 2000): Education - UK - Higher

BLUNKETT BACKTRACKS OVER TOP-UP TUITION FEES

J. Carvel and R. Smithers

Guardian, Feb. 16th 2000, p.9

At the next review of the purpose and funding of higher education in 2002, the question of permitting universities to charge differential fees was likely to be debated. Elite universities were delighted at the hint, as higher fees could provide the income they needed to maintain standards to attract the best students. Student leaders and the academic unions, however, reacted with fury.

(See also Times, Feb. 16th 2000, p.1 +2)

LET THE TOP UNIVERSITIES OFF THE FUNDING LEASH

M. Wolf

Financial Times, March 6th 2000, p.23

The article calls for an open debate on how to fund tertiary education. It proposes that students should pay more for elite university education. Britain's top universities should maximise their income to enable them to compete internationally.

SCREEN TEST

R. Boyle

Education and Training Review, vol.2, Winter 1999, p.18-19

Describes how UCAS is using information technology to facilitate access to higher education. In three years time UCAS intends to have phased out paper based working and to distribute all information about courses via the Internet. Applications will also have to be made online. UCAS has also launched a computer-based 'forecasting and planning service' that will enable universities to use postcode information and on-screen mapping to track their applicants, and to identify areas that send relatively few people into higher education. They will then work closely with local schools to encourage applicants from those areas.

UNIVERSITIES AGREE ON FUNDING REVIEW

J. Kelly

Financial Times, March 3rd 2000, p.4

Leaders of all Britain's universities have agreed on launching a review of funding that could lead to some charging "top-up fees" to meet rising costs. While government is pumping extra money into providing 37,000 more places and £25m into widening access to the socially excluded, the base funding for the sector is set to fall below inflation by 1%.

(See also Times, Mar. 3rd 2000, p.14; Daily Telegraph, Mar. 3rd 2000, p.2; Independent, Mar. 3rd 2000, p.13)

UNIVERSITY FEES UNDER SCRUTINY

J. Kelly

Financial Times, Feb. 25th 2000, p.5

Reports that Vice-Chancellors of leading universities are considering outline plans to charge higher, market-based tuition fees while widening access for the disadvantaged through scholarships and bursaries.

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