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Welfare Reform on the Web (May 2000): Pensions - Overseas

PARTIES TRY TO REACH POLITICAL CONSENSUS

H. Fromme

Pensions International, Issue 16, 2000, p.5

German politicians are preparing a major overhaul of the country's state-controlled pension systems. The system is currently under immense pressure because Germans are having fewer children, while at the same time they are getting older. There are still serious differences between the political parties, but across all divides it has become clear that private provision for old age will in future play a far bigger role than now.

THE DEVELOPMENT AND REFORM OF SOCIAL SECURITY PENSIONS: THE APPROACH OF THE INTERNATIONAL LABOUR OFFICE

G. Gillian

International Social Security Review, vol.53, 2000, p.35-63

Pension schemes are evolving rapidly. There is no single design which fits all countries. The question of what is the most appropriate design has to be weighed against other factors, particularly the historical and social context and the need to provide universal coverage and good governance. These will determine not only what is feasible and what is not, but also where the most desirable balance lies.

PENSION SYSTEM AND REFORMS - BRITAIN, HUNGARY, ITALY, POLAND AND SWEDEN

M. Augusztinovics

European Journal of Social Security, vol.1, no.1, 1999, p.351-382

This paper provides a brief summary of the main findings of a cross-country comparative study of pension systems and reforms completed in 1996 by a team of researchers from five countries. The comparison includes three established capitalist societies: Britain, Italy and Sweden, and two transition economies: Poland and Hungary. Pension systems and reforms are specific to individual countries but there common features and problems. One of the main conclusions is that attempting to separate social assistance from social insurance is a more substantial issue for pension reforms than the choice between public and private funded schemes.

SURPRISE OVER NZ RETIREMENT FUND INITIATIVE

T. Hall

Financial Times, March 9th 2000, p.14

Controversial plans have been unveiled by the New Zealand government to launch a dedicated pension fund using fiscal surpluses.

THE WORLD BANK APPROACH TO PENSION REFORM

R. Holtzmann

International Social Security Review, vol.53, 2000, p.11-34

Paper outlines the World Bank's thinking and worldwide involvement in pension reform. After a review of the three main reform options for unfunded systems (mere PAYG reform, a rapid and complete shift to a mandatory funded system and a gradual shift to a multipillar scheme, the Bank favours the multipillar approach, but in a pragmatic and country-specific manner.

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