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Welfare Reform on the Web (June 2000): Social Care - UK

THE CARE STANDARDS BILL

L. Convery

Health Law, vol.5, no.3, 2000, p.1-4

Commentary and comparison with the current provisions of the Registered Homes Act 1984. The Bill has adopted some of the existing provisions of the Act, but introduces new provisions to create a new registration authority and further registration requirements which will have far reaching consequences for registered social landlords and voluntary organisations on the administration of their supported housing staff.

CRISIS CLIMBS UP POLITICAL AGENDA

N. Huber

Community Care, no.1312, 2000, p.10-11

Announces a planned ministerial summit to tackle the social care recruitment crisis and a nation-wide recruitment drive by TOPGS UK. However no funding has been identified to cover the costs of the advertising campaign. Without funding, the workforce summit will be little more than a talking shop.

FLEXIBLE CONTRACTING: ECONOMIC CULTURES AND IMPLICIT CONTRACTS IN SOCIAL CARE

M. Mackintosh

Journal of Social Policy, vol.29, 2000, p.1-19

Drawing on case studies of two local authorities, the article identifies two distinct economic cultures in social care contracting. An arms-length contracting culture was found to be emerging in interaction with risk-averse commercial suppliers, while a 'partnership' was developing in association with non-profit providers who actively sought risk and responsibility.

HOURS OF NEED

A. Thompson

Community Care, no.1313, 2000, p.20-21

The demand for out-of-hours social services is growing and is likely to continue to do so given the prevalence of policies aimed at enabling needy clients to live in the community. More comprehensive emergency duty teams and co-ordinated out-of-hours services are essential.

NO SECRETS: GUIDANCE ON DEVELOPING MULTI-AGENCY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES TO PROTECT VULNERABLE ADULTS FROM ABUSE

Department of Health and Home Office 2000

Guidance requires local authorities to set up procedures for the protection of vulnerable adults similar to those in place for children. Requirements include: a multi-agency administrative framework; a multi-agency management committee; collaboration at operational, senior management, chief officer, local authority member, corporate and supervisory line management levels; and policy and service audit.

OUT OF SERVICES: A SURVEY OF SOCIAL SERVICES PROVISION FOR ELDERLY AND DISABLED PEOPLE IN ENGLAND

London: Needs Must, 2000

A survey of 1,541 Needs Must members found that even when individuals were assessed as needing personal care help, they did not always receive it as set out in their care plan. As well as breaching the service user's right to community care provision, this is a breach of the local authority's statutory duty. Report also unveiled inadequate assessments; reduction in services despite increased need; lack of consultation; excessive waiting times for adaptations; and service users' inability to pay excessive charges for necessary services.

PROS AND CONS OF PRIVATE CASH

N. Huber

Community Care, no.1313, 2000, p.12

Social services departments are waking up to the advantages of private finance initiatives, which provide cash-strapped councils with greater access to capital for new services, and could prove an ideal vehicle for delivering joint projects with health. However concerns are emerging that the bidding process takes too long and involves too much paperwork.

PUSHED TO THE MARGINS

A. Taylor

Community Care, no.1315, 2000, p.12

Social services provision in the UK is now strictly rationed, and potential recipients must satisfy increasingly stringent criteria to qualify for help.

SOCIAL SERVICES MUST FIGHT FOR A SHARE OF NHS CASH

N. Huber

Community Care, no.1315, 2000, p.10-11

Summarises the implications of the 2000 Budget for social care, explaining the Children's Tax Credit to be introduced in 2001, the Sure Start Maternity grant for low income mothers, and the raft of measures to encourage charitable giving by individuals.

TRAINING FOR CARE HOME MANAGERS

Anon.

Registered Homes and Services, vol.4, 2000, p.164-166

Gives an overview of draft national standards for training registered managers in health and social care.

TURNING ROUND A SERVICE

L. Brookes

Municipal Journal, 31st March - 6th April 2000, p.19

Describes how Ealing LBC turned round its social services department following a critical Social Services Inspectorate report in 1998. A cross-party task group of councillors installed a new management team. The department developed a strong performance management focus, professional standards were monitored and recruitment of permanent staff rose from 45% to 85%. Young people themselves were consulted and contributed to the changes.

(See also Community Care, no.1315, 2000, p.2-3)

VANISHING ACT

N. Valios

Community Care, no.1312, 2000, p.20-21

Discusses how the counselling aspect of social work is increasingly being contracted out to independent counsellors.

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