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Welfare Reform on the Web (July 2000): Social Care - UK

ARE MONITORS SWITCHED ON?

A. Thompson

Community Care, no.1321, 2000, p. 24-25

Some Directors of Social Services are challenging the quality of the evidence gathered by the Audit Commission and the Social Services Inspectorate in the course of their joint reviews.. There are particular concerns over the sampling techniques employed.

ARE THESE DANGEROUS LIAISONS

R. McKay

Community Care, no. 1321, 2000, p. 12

Devolution has increasingly led Scottish local authorities towards creating integrated departments in which social work is managed alongside housing, leisure, education and other services.

COMMUNITY CARE AND THE LAW

J. Dow

Managing Community Care, vol. 81, Apr. 2000, p. 9-14

Articles focuses on the legal issues arising from the Health Act 1999 and the Local Government Act 1999, particularly in relation to the governance of partnership arrangements and the commissioning of internal and external services under best value.

CUTTING LOSE?

M. Mellon and L. Bransburg

Community Care, no. 1316, 2000, p. 26-27

Articles looks at the impact of devolution on social care policies in Scotland and Wales. In Scotland, changes in social welfare have brought things more into line with practices in England. The Welsh Assembly has focused on services to children. It has demonstrated its commitment to participation and inclusion by involving the young people in decision-making and policy development.

IN DEFENCE OF THE PAST

J. Barraclough

Community Care, no. 1320, 2000, p. 24-25

From 1975 to the mid 1980s generic social workers worked in well resourced departments with a cross-section of different types of client. Following the Cleveland inquiry, there has been a move back to the concept of the expert specialist social worker who can focus exclusively on one area of work. This has presented social workers with a diet of repetitious cases, and in areas such as child protection, with a harrowing and difficult workload.

MAKING A SPLASH

N. Valios

Community Care, no. 1318, 2000, p. 20-21

With the implementation of the Health Act 1999, pooled budgets between social services departments and health authorities will become a reality. Article reports on how this is changing social care and what it will mean for the future of service provision.

NEW CONNECTIONS BETWEEN PUBLIC HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES

J. Robinson and S. Griffiths

Managing Community Care, vol. 8, Apr. 2000, p. 15-22

New public health policies present social services with new opportunities and challenges. A shared public health and social care agenda is emerging around health improvement, social exclusion and regeneration. Early sighs of synergy indicate that social services have a key role to play in shaping the public health agenda and in acting as a bridge between the NHS and the wider local authority.

RIGHTS AND WRONGS

B. Livesey

Community Care, no. 1321, 2000, p. 28-29

Article explains, with examples and case studies, the implications of the Human Rights Act 1998 for social workers and local authorities.

SECTOR'S WELCOME FOR PROTECTION LAWS OVERLOOKS STAFF RIGHTS ISSUE

R. Winchester

Community Care, no. 1316, 2000, p. 10-11

Argues that government measures to protect vulnerable service users from abuse through the provisions of the Protection of Children Act 1999, the Care Standards Bills, and the Criminal Justice and Court Services Bill could lead to serious injustices for care staff.

THE TRUE COST OF CARE

J. Glasby

Public Finance, Apr. 21st-27th 2000, p. 26

Local authority social service departments are in crisis and chronically short of funds. A wider public and professional understanding of the complexities of local government finance is needed if progress is to be made in resolving these difficulties.

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