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Welfare Reform on the Web (August 2010): Social security - UK - New Deal

Conservative priorities for welfare to work

T. May

Working Brief, May 2010, p. 8-9

The Conservatives believe that work is the most sustainable route out of poverty. In the run up to the May 2010 general election, the author sets out Conservative Party policies for getting unemployed people off benefits and into work. At the heart of the Party's plans is the Work Programme, a single employment programme for all unemployed people, including those on Incapacity Benefit. Services would be contracted out to private and voluntary sector providers who will be paid at differential rates for getting unemployed people into work to reflect the level of difficulty of individual cases.

(For an overview of the main parties' priorities on welfare to work, see Working Brief, May 2010, p. 12-14)

Labour: making a choice that will change the future

J. Knight

Working Brief, May 2010, p. 6-7

In the run up to the 2010 general election, the author explains what the Labour government did to combat unemployment during the 2009 recession, and their plans for preventing unemployment in the future. The article sets out Labour's plans for investing in job creation and training, in work guarantees for the long term unemployed, and in helping people with disabilities to move off benefits and into jobs through a reassessment of the Incapacity Benefit claims of 1.5m people by 2014.

(For an overview of the main parties' priorities on welfare to work, see Working Brief, May 2010, p. 12-14)

Liberal Democrats: make the system work for those who need it most

P. Rowan

Working Brief, May 2010, p.10-11

In the run up to the 2010 general election, this article outlines the Liberal Democrat Party's plans for getting unemployed people into work. These comprise provision of financial incentives, improved advice and help for new claimants from JobCentre Plus, more support for young unemployed people through access to further education, training and work experience schemes, and up front grants to disabled people looking for employment to pay for workplace adaptations.

(For an overview of the main parties' priorities on welfare to work, see Working Brief, May 2010, p. 12-14)

Lone parent obligations: early findings from the evaluation

J. Casebourne and R. Gloster

Working Brief, May 2010, p. 19-22 From November 2008 lone parents with a youngest child aged 12 or over could no longer claim income support solely on the grounds of being a lone parent. From 2010, lone parents with a youngest child of seven or more also lost the entitlement. These lone parents can either move into work or claim Jobseeker's Allowance if they are able to work or Employment and Support Allowance if they are sick or disabled. This article reports on an early evaluation of the effects of these lone parent obligations. On the whole, the implementation of lone parent obligations was considered to have gone well, with only a few teething problems.

Welfare to work in the polls: what the voters think

J. Latter

Working Brief, May 2010, p. 16-17

In the run up to the 2010 general election, this article seeks to explore public perceptions of the importance of unemployment along with the related issues of pensions, benefits and social security, and of the performance of the main political parties in relation to both. Results of Ipsos Mori opinion polls show that the issues of unemployment and benefits are of relatively low salience for the general public.

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