Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (August 2000): National Health Service - Community and Primary Care Services

COUNSELLING IN PRIMARY CARE: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

J. Eatock

British Journal of Guidance and Counselling vol. 28, 2000, p. 161-173

Article introduces the subject of counselling in primary care by tracing its development and by stating the main challenges it faces in the reformed NHS. These include: the need to establish the professional identity of the counsellor in primary care; the need to establish mechanisms for professional regulation, co-ordination and management; and the need to prove the effectiveness of counselling. Counselling may be subsumed into the roles of other health care professionals in primary care, may become "medicalised" or may develop further and continue to offer an alternative perspective on health and healing.

COUNSELLING IN PRIMARY CARE AND THE NEW NHS

J. Foster

British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, vol. 28, 2000, p. 175-190

Article presents a detailed overview of recent structural changes in the NHS and looks at their effect on counsellors working in primary care. It addresses issues relating to the supervision counsellors working in primary care, the implication of managed counselling services, the requirements of clinical governance, and the necessity of audit and evaluation to inform service and individual development.

HIT AND MISS

J. Baeza, S. Harrington and R. May

Health Service Journal, vol. 110, May 25th 2000, p. 26-27

A survey of practices in a primary care group in outer London found many were poorly prepared for implementing clinical governance. More than half consisted of one doctor, and a quarter of practices were not computerised. Only a third had a staff development plan, and a minority had sought patients views on new services. Although three-quarters of practices wee using guidelines, few had been trained in their application.

IS THERE A CURE

A. Miles

Times 2, May 22nd 2000, p. 3-5

Using Birmingham as a case study, article describes the government's reforms of primary care. These are aimed at delegating responsibility for as many services as possible from hospitals to GPs, and from GPs to practice and community nurses. GP practices have been banded into Primary Care Groups, which will transform into Primary Care Trusts with full responsibility for commissioning services for their locality. Reforms may fail due to the conservatism of GPs, who distrust government promises and regard the reforms as a threat to their independence and autonomy.

THE NATIONAL TRACKER SURVEY OF PRIMARY CARE GROUPS AND TRUSTS: PROGRESS AND CHALLENGES 1999-2000

Editors: D. Wilkin, S. Gillam, B. Leese

Manchester: University of Manchester, 1999

Finds the primary care groups are under political pressure to rush to trust status before they are ready to take on new roles and responsibilities. PCGs have worked hard to involve local health staff and communities, and have laid the foundations for successful corporate working, but still have a long way to go. A key issue is lack of relevant, accurate and timely information to underpin core functions.

URL: http://www.npcrdc.man.ac.uk/pages/research/pcg.htm

PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT: WHOSE PRIORITY AND RESPONSIBILITY

D. Florin and W. Anderson

British Journal of Health Care Management, vol. 6, 2000, p. 258-261

Looks at progress made to date by Primary Care Groups in London in involving the public in their decision making.

SEAMS GOOD TO US

J. Ward and R. Gupta

Health Service Journal, vol. 110, June 15th 2000, p. 30-31

Greater use of GPs, both in general practice and hospitals, could reduce waiting times for NHS treatment. Primary care groups might develop specialist services, and the development of GP specialists should be considered. Allowing GPs with a special interest in surgery to perform some operations would reduce pressure on consultants' lists.

SPEED BUMPS

D. Carlisle

Health Service Journal, vol. 110, June 29th 2000, p. 13-14

The pace of the upgrading of primary Care Groups to trust status is increasing, but opposition to the moves is growing.

Search Welfare Reform on the Web