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Welfare Reform on the Web (August 2000): Education - UK - Training

AN INSECURE FUTURE FOR WORK-BASED LEARNING?

D. Boyer

Working Brief, issue 114, 2000, p. 16-17

Argues that the emerging infrastructure for work-based learning for over 16s is inappropriately weighted towards the delivery of formal test-based qualifications with mandatory "off-the-job" elements. The policy focus so far has been on provision for 16 to 18 year olds rather than adults; on training in large F E Colleges rather than on learning in smaller voluntary sector organisations; and on the attainment of qualifications rather than jobs.

LEARNING AND SKILLS COUNCIL: FUNDING FLOWS AND BUSINESS PROCESSES

DEPARTMENT FOR EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT 2000

Document focuses on the funding relationships between the Secretary of State and the Learning and Skills Council (LSC); the national LSC and its 47 local branches; and the local LSCs and providers, local education authorities and employers.

LEARNING TO SUCCEED: POST-16 FUNDING AND ALLOCATIONS: FIRST TECHNICAL CONSULTATION PAPER

DEPARTMENT FOR EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT

Nottingham: DFEE Publications, 2000

Paper sets out initial thinking on the type of funding arrangements the Learning and Skills Council and Employment Service will need to provide post-16 education and training. The fundamental requirements of the new funding and allocations system are fairness, transparency and objectivity. A high proportion of post-16 funds will be distributed according to national funding formulae, supported by a structure of national rates.

LEARNING TO SUCCEED: POST-16 FUNDING: SECOND TECHNICAL CONSULTAITON PAPER

DEPARTMENT FOR EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT 2000

Proposes that sixth forms, further educational colleges and training companies should be paid for each course they run, rather than the number of students they enrol. Part of the funding for each course will be paid up front, but some will be dependent on the student gaining a qualification. Other plans include paying extra cash to schools and colleges that recruit students from deprived areas.

LEARNING TO WORK

D. Walker

Guardian, June 28th 2000, p. 21

Industry is suffering from a skills shortage. Article argues that this is due in part to the unresolved tensions between the tradition of liberal education for its own sake found in Britains schools and vocational training managed by the quasi-autonomous training and enterprise councils (TECs).

PAYING FOR LEARNING: THE FUTURE OF INDIVIDUAL LEARNING ACCOUNTS

T. Millns (editor)

London: Institute for Public Policy Research, 2000

Proposes the creation of personal learning accounts to fund lifelong learning. These should integrate learning loans, personal savings, pensions, employer contributions, state support and tax credits. Individuals should be able to draw down funds from their pension to invest in their own development. Employers could promote learning by setting up 'opt in' training and development plans, by which employees could trigger an automatic contribution to their personal development accounts by putting in matching funding.

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