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Welfare Reform on the Web (October 2000): Education - UK - Higher

BLAIR AND BLACKSTONE SAY NO TO STUDENT TOP-UP FEES

B. Russell

Independent, July 27th 2000, p. 11

The government has stated that it has no plans to introduce "top-up" fees for university students. It has reserve powers to prevent universities from charging additional fees.

(See also Financial Times, July 27th 2000, p. 2)

BUILDING EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS INTO THE HIGHER EDUCATION CURRICULUM: A UNIVERSITY-WIDE INITIATIVE

S. Fallows and C. Steven

Education and training, vol. 42, no. 2, 2000, p. 75-82

It is increasingly necessary for students to have skills beyond academic knowledge to enhance their prospects of finding a job. These employability skills include information retrieval, communication and presentation, planning and problem solving and social development and interaction. Article describes the University of Luton's initiative to ensure that all its students acquire these skills and to embed them within the academic curriculum for all disciplines.

IF YOU WANT A DECENT DEGREE, PAY FOR IT

L. Purves

Times, 11th July 2000, p. 16

Argues in favour of charging British students the true cost of their degrees in order to increase the funding available to universities.

INNOVATION AND PROGRESS: INVESTORS IN PEOPLE IN HIGHER EDUCATION

R. W. Harris

International Journal of Education Management, vol. 14, 2000, p. 142-

The University of Luton became in 1994 the first university to secure recognition as an Investor in People, and in 1997 it was successful in gaining re-approval for a further period of three years. Article explains why the University decided to apply for recognition, how it prepared for the assessment visits and what the long term organisational benefits have been.

NEW TESTS TO STEER STAR PUPILS TO ELITE COLLEGES

J. Kelly

Financial Times, Aug, 18th 2000, p.2

Reports that government aims to introduce Advanced Extension Awards to stretch the ablest students by 2002. The new awards will be used alongside aptitude tests to ensure that the brightest students get places at elite universities regardless of social background.

OXFORD WILL USE TESTS TO SPOT CREATIVE THINKERS

D. Charter

Times, July 31st 2000, p. 3

Oxford University is piloting a test aimed at measuring "fluid intelligence" which is determined neither by social class nor by a candidate's type of secondary education. Results will be used to inform the final decision about whether or not to offer a candidate a place.

STUDENTS SHOULD BOOST THEIR FUND OF KNOWLEDGE

M. Wolf

Financial Times, July 24th 2000, p. 23

Britain's universities are under-funded and academics are poorly paid. The problem could be solved by allowing them to charge differential fees and to fund these through an income-contingent loan scheme, combined, ideally, with a scholarship system for outstanding students from poor backgrounds.

UNIVERSITY COSTS FORCE STUDENTS TO STAY AT HOME

D. Charter

Times, July 21st 2000, p. 8

The introduction of tuition fees combined with the scrapping of the student grant has led to a rise in the number of students living at home. The number of young people taking a "gap year" has also increased as teenagers seek to earn money to support themselves at university.

(See also Daily Telegraph, July 21st 2000, p. 6; Financial Times, July 21st 2000, p. 6)

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