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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2000): Education - UK - Higher

FUNDING OPTIONS FOR UNIVERSITIES

J. Kelly

Financial Times, Sept. 11th 2000, p. 6

Vice-chancellors will consider radical options for the funding of universities - including voluntary "privatisation" of those able to attract fee-paying students, at their annual conference.

HALF OF FULL-TIME STUDENTS WILL PAY NO FEES

J. O'Leary

Times, Sept. 15th 2000, p. 12

Half of all full-time university students will not pay tuition fees this year as the Government unveiled a series of measures to attract more young people "from the wrong side of the tracks" into higher education. The threshold at which parents begin to pay for tuition is to rise from £17,370 to £20,000 ensuring that only about 50 per cent of students would be required to make any payments. David Blunkett launched a £150m package to be spent over three years. Elite universities will be given extra funding to help to trawl disadvantaged areas for bright students and all higher education institutions will receive state support to run summer schools and improve links with schools. Bursaries for poor students will be extended and new programmes created to encourage teenagers to continue in education.

(See also: Financial Times, Sept. 15th 2000, p. 7; Guardian, Sept. 15th 2000, p. 6; Independent, Sept. 15th 2000, p. 10)

PAYING FOR REDBRICK, PLATE-GLASS AND CLASS

J. Kelly

Financial Times, Sept. 22nd 2000, p. 23

University vice-chancellors are debating new approaches to funding their institutions. Options include removal of the government imposed cap on student fees, introduction of a tax on graduates' incomes and large state endowments which could be invested to generate income.

SCHOOL MAY PRACTISE WHAT IT PREACHES

S. Jones

Financial Times, Sept. 4th 2000, p. 15

Reports that Sheffield Hallam University is investigating the feasibility of turning its business school into a profit-making company.

UNIVERSITIES' EXTRA PLACES GO BEGGING

J. O'Leary

Times, Aug. 29th 2000, p. 1

About 40,000 extra university places have been made available in 2000 in the first phase of the renewed expansion of higher education, but nine days after the publication of the A level results, only 5,000 of these have been taken. Applications have declined for the second successive year, with 419,836 people seeking university places compared with 428,238 at the same point in 1998.

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