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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2000): Education - UK - Training

LABOUR OFFER OF APPRENTICE PLACE FOR ALL YOUNGSTERS

W. Woodward

Guardian, Aug. 28th 2000, p. 7

A promise of an apprenticeship place for all 16 to 18-year-olds in a skills and training package is to be included in the Labour Party's manifesto. Most apprenticeships will be organised by the private sector, but it is hoped that the public sector, which pays fees to training colleges, can expand if necessary.

A LADDER OUT OF THE LOW-SKILLS ECONOMY

J. Kelly

Financial Times, Sept. 6th 2000, p. 23

Summarises the government's reforms of vocational training. At the heart of these are the business-led National Learning and Skills Council and its local arms which will oversee post-16 education and training from 2001. The government is also creating a so-called vocational ladder of qualifications to run beside academic exams. These range of vocational GCSEs due to start in 2002 to skills based Foundation Degrees starting in autumn 2001.

SHERLOCK HOMES IN ON QUALITY CONTROL FOR ADULT EDUCATION

J. Lamb

People Management. vol. 6, Sept. 14th 2000, p. 12

The Chief inspector of the new Adult Learning Inspectorate is determined to change the outdated emphasis on college-based training and to form a positive working relationship with Ofsted.

VOCATIONAL SECTOR REFORMS: A CHALLENGE TO PROVIDERS

D. Boyer

Working Brief, issue 117, 2000, p. 13-16

Government reforms of the post-16 training and learning sector aim to reduce the number of people with skills below level 2 so that they can take advantage of the employment opportunities brought about by the so-called "knowledge economy". In order to drive up standards within the sector government will subject training providers to a regime of strict assessment and inspection. It is also considering proposals to introduce minimum skills and qualifications for trainers.

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