Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2000): National Health Service - Community and Primary Care Services

DRUG MISUSE AND PRIMARY CARE IN THE NEW NHS

C. Gerada

Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy, vol. 7, 2000, p. 213-221

Describes, from a predominantly English primary care point of view, the changing face of primary care, its altered relationship to secondary care, and how primary care can best act to provide a service to patients with drug-related problems. It also attempts to guide the reader through some of the key policy changes that have occurred and that have relevance in planning and delivering services to substance misusers.

FAST AND LOOSE

A. McGauran

Health Service Journal, vol. 110, Sept. 21st 2000, p. 17

Doctors' leaders are complaining that their advice has not been headed in drafting the contracts for the third wave of personal medical services pilots.

HEALTH PLAN 'NEEDS 10,000 MORE GPs'

J. Carvel

Guardian, Sept. 8th 2000, p. 5

Doctors are warning the health secretary, Alan Milburn, that he will be unable to deliver the government's plan for NHS reform without a bigger increase in the number of GPs. According to the BMA there would have to be an additional 8,000-10,000 family doctors, instead of the 2,000 promised by ministers. Without the increase it will be impossible to keep the promise of access to a GP within 48 hours.

SERVING FROM THE SHADOWS

J. Smith et al

Health Service Journal, vol. 110, Aug. 31st 2000, p. 22-24

A study of appointments to the boards of 59 Primary Care Groups covered by the 13 health authorities in the West Midlands found concerns about fairness, openness and transparency. There was concern about the lack of a competency framework for GP members. Health authorities questioned whether the lay members of boards were representative of the local population. Some health authorities provided no induction training for boards.

TREATING DRUG DEPENDENCE IN PRIMARY CARE: WORTHY AMBITION BUT FLAWED POLICY?

J. Merrill and S. Ruben

Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy, vol. 7, 2000, p. 203-212

National policy in the UK is to increase the role of GPs in treating drug abusers. By working in "shared care" arrangements with specialist services, they are intended to become the main providers of treatment, and in particular methodone maintenance. There is little evidence to support the effectiveness of this approach. Studies on GPs' attitudes to treating drug users, their knowledge and prescribing practices give rise to concern.

Search Welfare Reform on the Web