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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2000): National Health Service - Funding

DON'T SHOOT THE MESSENGER

P. Coates

Public Finance, Aug. 25th - 31st 2000, p. 16-19

Refutes claims that Private Finance Initiative schemes in the NHS are to blame for cutting bed numbers, increasing the number of private beds and costing more than equivalent publicly funded schemes. In particular argues that reductions in bed numbers are due to clinical change, not the PFI.

NEW PAY OFFER TO TACKLE NHS STAFFING CRISIS

T. Baldwin

Times, Sept. 18th 2000, p.4

Alan Milburn announced a new "recruitment and retention" allowance of up to £1,000 to be paid to nurses and other key workers living in London and other expensive cities. The money will come from the funds allocated for rebuilding the health service in the Budget.

NURSING UNIONS SEEK BIG PAY RISE

J. Carvel

Guardian, Sept. 22nd 2000, p. 7

Nursing unions have demanded a substantial pay rise to avert a growing shortage of hospital staff that threatens the government's plans for expanding the NHS.

(See also Times, Sept. 22nd 2000, p. 11)

THE PFI IN HEALTH

C. Nicholson

New Economy, vol. 7, 2000, p. 138-142

The Private Finance Initiative in the healthcare sector has been criticised for delivering poor value for money. This has arisen because PFI schemes have been confined to provision of hospital buildings, and hotel services. As a result of excluding clinical services from PFI provision, the scope for innovation and efficiency has been stifled.

PRIVATE FINANCE INITIATIVE

Health Service Journal, vol. 110, Sept. 7th 2000, Special Report. 12p.

Overview of the private finance initiatives in the NHS show that they are spreading from acute services to staff accommodation, primary care and mental health projects. Report also summarises the history of the building of the first PFI hospital, Cumberland Infirmary.

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