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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2000): Social Security - UK - New Deal

CASELOAD CAUSE FOR CONCERN IN ONE PILOTS

B. Dillon

Working Brief, issue 117, 2000, p. 11-12

Voluntary take-up alongside compulsory participation in work focused interviews has increased personal advisers' workloads in ONE pilots, so that there is a danger of insufficient time being allowed to explain the system to claimants.

MODERNIZING SOCIAL SECURITY? LABOUR AND ITS WELFARE-TO-WORK STRATEGY

C. Grover and J. Stewart

Social Policy and Administration, vol. 34, 2000, p. 235-252

The Labour government's social security reforms aim to help those in need without eroding work incentives. The politicians are informed by economists who believe that the numbers of unemployed people can only be reduced, without causing inflation, by increasing the numbers of previously economically inactive people who are pitched at "entry level" wages. Their reforms therefore subsidise low-paid employment through in-work "benefits" such as the Working Families Tax Credit and the Childcare Tax Credit. However those people who remain out of work face life on stigmatised social security benefits that are not adequate to meet their needs.

PPPs AND THE JOBLESS

E. Michielsens, L. Shackleton and P. Urwin

New Economy, vol. 7, 2000, p. 168-171

Collaboration between the public and private sectors in job placement is relatively unusual in the European context. The UK has a large and dynamic private recruitment industry, and its expertise may well be of assistance in achieving the New Deals' goals. Nevertheless hard-to-place and less motivated job seekers represent challenges that go beyond those normally faced by the private sector.

RISKS PAY OFF

P. McCurry

Guardian. Society, Sept. 20th 2000, p 15

Case study of Working Links, a private company contracted to the Department for Education and Employment, to place long-term jobless people in work in nine government designated employment zones.

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